atlantis

STS-76 - 4" - Space Coast International

STS-76 was NASA's 76th Space Shuttle mission, and the 16th mission for Atlantis. STS-76 launched on 22 March 1996 at 3:13 am EST (UTC −5) from Kennedy Space Center launch pad 39B. STS-76 lasted over 9 days, traveled about 3,800,000 miles (6,100,000 km) while orbiting Earth an estimated 145 times, and landing at 5:28 am PST (UTC −8) on 31 March 1996 at Edwards Air Force Base runway 22.
The flight was the third Shuttle mission to dock with the Russian Space Station Mir, as part of the Shuttle-Mir Program, carrying astronaut Shanon Lucid to the orbital laboratory to replace NASA astronaut Norm Thagard. STS-76 also carried a SPACEHAB single module along with Lucid, and on flight day 6 Linda Godwin and Michael R. Clifford performed the first U.S. spacewalk around two docked spacecraft.

This patch was produced by Space Coast International and was carried on board STS-76 in the Official Flight Kit. It has some minor differences from the official A-B Emblem version, primarily in the Mir detail and extra set of solar panels. 

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4" / 100mm
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STS-76 - 4" - A-B Emblem Prototype

STS-76 was NASA's 76th Space Shuttle mission, and the 16th mission for Atlantis. STS-76 launched on 22 March 1996 at 3:13 am EST (UTC −5) from Kennedy Space Center launch pad 39B. STS-76 lasted over 9 days, traveled about 3,800,000 miles (6,100,000 km) while orbiting Earth an estimated 145 times, and landing at 5:28 am PST (UTC −8) on 31 March 1996 at Edwards Air Force Base runway 22.
The flight was the third Shuttle mission to dock with the Russian Space Station Mir, as part of the Shuttle-Mir Program, carrying astronaut Shanon Lucid to the orbital laboratory to replace NASA astronaut Norm Thagard. STS-76 also carried a SPACEHAB single module along with Lucid, and on flight day 6 Linda Godwin and Michael R. Clifford performed the first U.S. spacewalk around two docked spacecraft.

This is the A-B Emblem prototype version of the STS-76 patch. It has white thread instead of black for the Mir details and an extra set of solar arrays. The stars have a black shadow, but do not appear behind the yellow contrails like in the souvenir version. 

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4" / 100mm
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STS-36 - 4" - Unknown Maker

STS-36 was a NASA Space Shuttle mission, during which Space Shuttle Atlantis carried a classified payload for the U.S. Department of Defense (believed to have been a Misty reconnaissance satellite) into orbit. STS-36 was the 34th shuttle mission overall, the sixth flight for Atlantis, and the fourth night launch of the shuttle program. It launched from Kennedy Space Center, Florida, on 28 February 1990, and landed on 4 March.

This patch is probably from Cape Kennedy Medals. The outer border is twill rather than fully embrodiered.

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4" / 100mm
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STS-135 - 4" - Unknown maker

STS-135 (ISS assembly flight ULF7) was the 135th and final mission of the American Space Shuttle program. It used the orbiter Atlantis and hardware originally processed for the STS-335 contingency mission, which was not flown. STS-135 launched on 8 July 2011, and landed on 21 July 2011, following a one-day mission extension. The four-person crew was the smallest of any shuttle mission since STS-6 in April 1983. The mission's primary cargo was the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) Raffaello and a Lightweight Multi-Purpose Carrier (LMC), which were delivered to the International Space Station (ISS). The flight of Raffaello marked the only time that Atlantis carried an MPLM.

The STS-135 patch represents the space shuttle Atlantis embarking on its mission to resupply the International Space Station. Atlantis is centered over elements of the NASA emblem depicting how the space shuttle has been at the heart of NASA for the last 30 years. It also pays tribute to the entire NASA and contractor team that made possible all the incredible accomplishments of the space shuttle. Omega, the last letter in the Greek alphabet, recognizes this mission as the last flight of the Space Shuttle Program.

This version of the STS-135 patch is nearly identical to the A-B Emblem version but has some subtle differences between the stars and "STS" and "135" sizing.

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5" / 128mm
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STS-135 - 4" - Unknown maker

STS-135 (ISS assembly flight ULF7) was the 135th and final mission of the American Space Shuttle program. It used the orbiter Atlantis and hardware originally processed for the STS-335 contingency mission, which was not flown. STS-135 launched on 8 July 2011, and landed on 21 July 2011, following a one-day mission extension. The four-person crew was the smallest of any shuttle mission since STS-6 in April 1983. The mission's primary cargo was the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) Raffaello and a Lightweight Multi-Purpose Carrier (LMC), which were delivered to the International Space Station (ISS). The flight of Raffaello marked the only time that Atlantis carried an MPLM.

The STS-135 patch represents the space shuttle Atlantis embarking on its mission to resupply the International Space Station. Atlantis is centered over elements of the NASA emblem depicting how the space shuttle has been at the heart of NASA for the last 30 years. It also pays tribute to the entire NASA and contractor team that made possible all the incredible accomplishments of the space shuttle. Omega, the last letter in the Greek alphabet, recognizes this mission as the last flight of the Space Shuttle Program.

This version of the STS-135 patch has a single colored external tank and slightly larger lettering for the crew names. The stars are significantly larger dots.

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5" / 128mm
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STS-135 - 4" - Unknown maker

STS-135 (ISS assembly flight ULF7) was the 135th and final mission of the American Space Shuttle program. It used the orbiter Atlantis and hardware originally processed for the STS-335 contingency mission, which was not flown. STS-135 launched on 8 July 2011, and landed on 21 July 2011, following a one-day mission extension. The four-person crew was the smallest of any shuttle mission since STS-6 in April 1983. The mission's primary cargo was the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) Raffaello and a Lightweight Multi-Purpose Carrier (LMC), which were delivered to the International Space Station (ISS). The flight of Raffaello marked the only time that Atlantis carried an MPLM.

The STS-135 patch represents the space shuttle Atlantis embarking on its mission to resupply the International Space Station. Atlantis is centered over elements of the NASA emblem depicting how the space shuttle has been at the heart of NASA for the last 30 years. It also pays tribute to the entire NASA and contractor team that made possible all the incredible accomplishments of the space shuttle. Omega, the last letter in the Greek alphabet, recognizes this mission as the last flight of the Space Shuttle Program.

This version of the STS-135 patch is nearly identical to the A-B Emblem version however, there is a black stitch between the colors of the external tank. The stars on the blue field are slightly larger dots. 

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5" / 128mm
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STS-135 - 4" - A-B Emblem

STS-135 (ISS assembly flight ULF7) was the 135th and final mission of the American Space Shuttle program. It used the orbiter Atlantis and hardware originally processed for the STS-335 contingency mission, which was not flown. STS-135 launched on 8 July 2011, and landed on 21 July 2011, following a one-day mission extension. The four-person crew was the smallest of any shuttle mission since STS-6 in April 1983. The mission's primary cargo was the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) Raffaello and a Lightweight Multi-Purpose Carrier (LMC), which were delivered to the International Space Station (ISS). The flight of Raffaello marked the only time that Atlantis carried an MPLM.

The STS-135 patch represents the space shuttle Atlantis embarking on its mission to resupply the International Space Station. Atlantis is centered over elements of the NASA emblem depicting how the space shuttle has been at the heart of NASA for the last 30 years. It also pays tribute to the entire NASA and contractor team that made possible all the incredible accomplishments of the space shuttle. Omega, the last letter in the Greek alphabet, recognizes this mission as the last flight of the Space Shuttle Program.

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5" / 128mm
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STS-132 - 4" - Unknown maker

STS-132 (ISS assembly flight ULF4) was a NASA Space Shuttle mission, during which Space Shuttle Atlantis docked with the International Space Station on 16 May 2010. STS-132 was launched from the Kennedy Space Center on 14 May 2010. The primary payload was the Russian Rassvet Mini-Research Module, along with an Integrated Cargo Carrier-Vertical Light Deployable (ICC-VLD). Atlantis landed at the Kennedy Space Center on 26 May 2010.
STS-132 was initially scheduled to be the final flight of Atlantis, provided that the STS-335/STS-135 Launch On Need rescue mission was not flown. However, in February 2011, NASA declared that the final mission of Atlantis and of the Space Shuttle program, STS-135, would be flown regardless of the funding situation.

The STS-132 mission patch features Atlantis flying off into the sunset as the end of the Space Shuttle Program approaches. However the sun is also heralding the promise of a new day as it rises for the first time on a new ISS module, the MRM-1, which is also named Rassvet, the Russian word for dawn.

This version of the STS-132 patch lacks the gold border around the Atlantis orbiter. It also has a cut edge.

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4" / 100mm
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STS-132 - 4" - A-B Emblem

STS-132 (ISS assembly flight ULF4) was a NASA Space Shuttle mission, during which Space Shuttle Atlantis docked with the International Space Station on 16 May 2010. STS-132 was launched from the Kennedy Space Center on 14 May 2010. The primary payload was the Russian Rassvet Mini-Research Module, along with an Integrated Cargo Carrier-Vertical Light Deployable (ICC-VLD). Atlantis landed at the Kennedy Space Center on 26 May 2010.
STS-132 was initially scheduled to be the final flight of Atlantis, provided that the STS-335/STS-135 Launch On Need rescue mission was not flown. However, in February 2011, NASA declared that the final mission of Atlantis and of the Space Shuttle program, STS-135, would be flown regardless of the funding situation.

The STS-132 mission patch features Atlantis flying off into the sunset as the end of the Space Shuttle Program approaches. However the sun is also heralding the promise of a new day as it rises for the first time on a new ISS module, the MRM-1, which is also named Rassvet, the Russian word for dawn.

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4" / 100mm
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STS-122 - 4" - Unknown maker

STS-122 was a NASA Space Shuttle mission to the International Space Station (ISS), flown by the Space Shuttle Atlantis. STS-122 marked the 24th shuttle mission to the ISS, and the 121st space shuttle flight since STS-1.
The mission was also referred to as ISS-1E by the ISS program. The primary objective of STS-122 was to deliver the European Columbus science laboratory, built by the European Space Agency (ESA), to the station. It also returned Expedition 16 Flight Engineer Daniel M. Tani to Earth. Tani was replaced on Expedition 16 by Léopold Eyharts, a French Flight Engineer representing ESA. After Atlantis' landing, the orbiter was prepared for STS-125, the final servicing mission for the Hubble Space Telescope.

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4" / 100mm
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STS-400 - "Hubble Rescue Team"

STS-400 was the Space Shuttle contingency support (Launch On Need) flight which would have been launched using Space Shuttle Endeavour if a major problem occurred on Space Shuttle Atlantis during STS-125, the final Hubble Space Telescope servicing mission (HST SM-4).
Due to the much lower orbital inclination of the HST compared to the ISS, the shuttle crew would have been unable to use the International Space Station as a "safe haven" and NASA would not have been able to follow the usual plan of recovering the crew with another shuttle at a later date. Instead, NASA developed a plan to conduct a shuttle-to-shuttle rescue mission, similar to proposed rescue missions for pre-ISS flights. The rescue mission would have been launched only three days after call up and as early as seven days after the launch of STS-125 since the crew of Atlantis would only have about three weeks of consumables after launch.

This patch is an unofficial reproduction based on original artwork. 

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4" / 100mm
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STS-400 - STS-125 Launch On Need

STS-400 was the Space Shuttle contingency support (Launch On Need) flight which would have been launched using Space Shuttle Endeavour if a major problem occurred on Space Shuttle Atlantis during STS-125, the final Hubble Space Telescope servicing mission (HST SM-4).
Due to the much lower orbital inclination of the HST compared to the ISS, the shuttle crew would have been unable to use the International Space Station as a "safe haven" and NASA would not have been able to follow the usual plan of recovering the crew with another shuttle at a later date. Instead, NASA developed a plan to conduct a shuttle-to-shuttle rescue mission, similar to proposed rescue missions for pre-ISS flights. The rescue mission would have been launched only three days after call up and as early as seven days after the launch of STS-125 since the crew of Atlantis would only have about three weeks of consumables after launch.

This patch is an unofficial reproduction based on original artwork. 

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3.25" / 82mm
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STS-125 - 4" - Cape Kennedy Medals

STS-125, or HST-SM4 (Hubble Space Telescope Servicing Mission 4), was the fifth and final space shuttle servicing mission to the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Launch occurred on 11 May 2009 at 2:01 pm EDT. Landing occurred on 24 May at 11:39 am EDT, with the mission lasting a total of just under 13 days.
Space Shuttle Atlantis carried two new instruments to the Hubble Space Telescope, the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph and the Wide Field Camera 3. The mission also replaced a Fine Guidance Sensor, six gyroscopes, and two battery unit modules to allow the telescope to continue to function at least through 2014. The crew also installed new thermal blanket insulating panels to provide improved thermal protection, and a soft-capture mechanism that would aid in the safe de-orbiting of the telescope by an unmanned spacecraft at the end of its operational lifespan. The mission also carried an IMAX camera and the crew documented the progress of the mission for an upcoming IMAX movie.

This version has a thinner border around the solar panels of the HST and black for the panels themselves.

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4" / 100mm
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STS-125 - 4" - A-B Emblem

STS-125, or HST-SM4 (Hubble Space Telescope Servicing Mission 4), was the fifth and final space shuttle servicing mission to the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Launch occurred on 11 May 2009 at 2:01 pm EDT. Landing occurred on 24 May at 11:39 am EDT, with the mission lasting a total of just under 13 days.
Space Shuttle Atlantis carried two new instruments to the Hubble Space Telescope, the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph and the Wide Field Camera 3. The mission also replaced a Fine Guidance Sensor, six gyroscopes, and two battery unit modules to allow the telescope to continue to function at least through 2014. The crew also installed new thermal blanket insulating panels to provide improved thermal protection, and a soft-capture mechanism that would aid in the safe de-orbiting of the telescope by an unmanned spacecraft at the end of its operational lifespan. The mission also carried an IMAX camera and the crew documented the progress of the mission for an upcoming IMAX movie.

This version of the patch was the as-flown version. There was also a prototype version that was visible on crew suits during training for the mission and can be identified by the dotted stitching style around the solar panals of the HST. Thhis version has thicker, solid embroidery around the solar panels. 

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4" / 100mm
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STS-125 - 4" - Prototype Version - Unknown maker

STS-125, or HST-SM4 (Hubble Space Telescope Servicing Mission 4), was the fifth and final space shuttle servicing mission to the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Launch occurred on 11 May 2009 at 2:01 pm EDT. Landing occurred on 24 May at 11:39 am EDT, with the mission lasting a total of just under 13 days.
Space Shuttle Atlantis carried two new instruments to the Hubble Space Telescope, the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph and the Wide Field Camera 3. The mission also replaced a Fine Guidance Sensor, six gyroscopes, and two battery unit modules to allow the telescope to continue to function at least through 2014. The crew also installed new thermal blanket insulating panels to provide improved thermal protection, and a soft-capture mechanism that would aid in the safe de-orbiting of the telescope by an unmanned spacecraft at the end of its operational lifespan. The mission also carried an IMAX camera and the crew documented the progress of the mission for an upcoming IMAX movie.

This version of the patch was visible on crew suits during training for the mission and can be identified by the dotted stitching style around the solar panals of the HST. The version that was flown has thicker, solid embroidery around the solar panels. 

 KSC-08PD-2871

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4" / 100mm
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STS-122 - 4" - A-B Emblem

STS-122 was a NASA Space Shuttle mission to the International Space Station (ISS), flown by the Space Shuttle Atlantis. STS-122 marked the 24th shuttle mission to the ISS, and the 121st space shuttle flight since STS-1.
The mission was also referred to as ISS-1E by the ISS program. The primary objective of STS-122 was to deliver the European Columbus science laboratory, built by the European Space Agency (ESA), to the station. It also returned Expedition 16 Flight Engineer Daniel M. Tani to Earth. Tani was replaced on Expedition 16 by Léopold Eyharts, a French Flight Engineer representing ESA. After Atlantis' landing, the orbiter was prepared for STS-125, the final servicing mission for the Hubble Space Telescope.

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4" / 100mm
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STS-115 - 4" - Unknown maker

STS-115 was a Space Shuttle mission to the International Space Station (ISS) flown by Space Shuttle Atlantis. It was the first assembly mission to the ISS after the Columbia disaster, following the two successful Return to Flight missions, STS-114 and STS-121. STS-115 launched from Pad 39-B at the Kennedy Space Center on 9 September 2006 at 11:14:55 EDT (15:14:55 UTC).
The mission is also referred to as ISS-12A by the ISS program. The mission delivered the second port-side truss segment (ITS P3/P4), a pair of solar arrays (2A and 4A), and batteries. A total of three spacewalks were performed, during which the crew connected the systems on the installed trusses, prepared them for deployment, and did other maintenance work on the station.

This STS-115 patch has a different border and lacks horizontal elements on the solar arrays.

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4" / 100mm
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STS-115 - 4" - A-B Emblem (Modern)

STS-115 was a Space Shuttle mission to the International Space Station (ISS) flown by Space Shuttle Atlantis. It was the first assembly mission to the ISS after the Columbia disaster, following the two successful Return to Flight missions, STS-114 and STS-121. STS-115 launched from Pad 39-B at the Kennedy Space Center on 9 September 2006 at 11:14:55 EDT (15:14:55 UTC).
The mission is also referred to as ISS-12A by the ISS program. The mission delivered the second port-side truss segment (ITS P3/P4), a pair of solar arrays (2A and 4A), and batteries. A total of three spacewalks were performed, during which the crew connected the systems on the installed trusses, prepared them for deployment, and did other maintenance work on the station.

Size: 
4.25" / 108mm
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STS-115 - 4" - A-B Emblem

STS-115 was a Space Shuttle mission to the International Space Station (ISS) flown by Space Shuttle Atlantis. It was the first assembly mission to the ISS after the Columbia disaster, following the two successful Return to Flight missions, STS-114 and STS-121. STS-115 launched from Pad 39-B at the Kennedy Space Center on 9 September 2006 at 11:14:55 EDT (15:14:55 UTC).
The mission is also referred to as ISS-12A by the ISS program. The mission delivered the second port-side truss segment (ITS P3/P4), a pair of solar arrays (2A and 4A), and batteries. A total of three spacewalks were performed, during which the crew connected the systems on the installed trusses, prepared them for deployment, and did other maintenance work on the station.

Size: 
4.25" / 108mm
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STS-112 - 4" - Eagle Crest Emblem

STS-112 (ISS assembly flight 9A) was an 11-day space shuttle mission to the International Space Station (ISS) flown by Space Shuttle Atlantis.[1] Space Shuttle Atlantis was launched on 7 October 2002 at 19:45 UTC from the Kennedy Space Center's launch pad 39B to deliver the 28,000 pound Starboard 1 (S1) truss segment to the Space Station.[2] Ending a 4.5-million-mile journey, Atlantis landed at 15:44 UTC on 18 October 2002 on runway 33 at the Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility.
STS-112 carried several science experiments to the space station including the Plant Generic Bioprocessing Apparatus (PGBA), Commercial Generic Bioprocessing Apparatus (CGBA), the Protein Crystal Growth Single-locker Thermal Enclosure System housing the Protein Crystallization Apparatus for Microgravity (PCG-STES-PCAM) and samples for the Zeolite Crystal Growth Furnace (ZCG) experiment.

The STS-112 emblem symbolizes the ninth assembly mission (9A) to the International Space Station (ISS), a flight which is designed to deliver the Starboard 1 (S1) truss segment. The 30,000 pound truss segment will be lifted to orbit in the payload bay of the Space Shuttle Atlantis and installed using the ISS robotic arm. Three space walks will then be carried out to complete connections between the truss and ISS. Future missions will extend the truss structure to a span of over 350 feet so that it can support the solar arrays and radiators which provide the electrical power and cooling for ISS. The STS-112 emblem depicts ISS from the viewpoint of a departing shuttle, with the installed S1 truss segment outlined in red. A gold trail represents a portion of the Shuttle rendezvous trajectory. Where the trajectory meets ISS, a nine-pointed star represents the combined on-orbit team of six shuttle and three ISS crew members who together will complete the S1 truss installation. The trajectory continues beyond the ISS, ending in a six-pointed star representing the Atlantis and the STS-112 crew.

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4" / 100mm
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STS-112 - 4" - A-B Emblem

STS-112 (ISS assembly flight 9A) was an 11-day space shuttle mission to the International Space Station (ISS) flown by Space Shuttle Atlantis.[1] Space Shuttle Atlantis was launched on 7 October 2002 at 19:45 UTC from the Kennedy Space Center's launch pad 39B to deliver the 28,000 pound Starboard 1 (S1) truss segment to the Space Station.[2] Ending a 4.5-million-mile journey, Atlantis landed at 15:44 UTC on 18 October 2002 on runway 33 at the Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility.
STS-112 carried several science experiments to the space station including the Plant Generic Bioprocessing Apparatus (PGBA), Commercial Generic Bioprocessing Apparatus (CGBA), the Protein Crystal Growth Single-locker Thermal Enclosure System housing the Protein Crystallization Apparatus for Microgravity (PCG-STES-PCAM) and samples for the Zeolite Crystal Growth Furnace (ZCG) experiment.

The STS-112 emblem symbolizes the ninth assembly mission (9A) to the International Space Station (ISS), a flight which is designed to deliver the Starboard 1 (S1) truss segment. The 30,000 pound truss segment will be lifted to orbit in the payload bay of the Space Shuttle Atlantis and installed using the ISS robotic arm. Three space walks will then be carried out to complete connections between the truss and ISS. Future missions will extend the truss structure to a span of over 350 feet so that it can support the solar arrays and radiators which provide the electrical power and cooling for ISS. The STS-112 emblem depicts ISS from the viewpoint of a departing shuttle, with the installed S1 truss segment outlined in red. A gold trail represents a portion of the Shuttle rendezvous trajectory. Where the trajectory meets ISS, a nine-pointed star represents the combined on-orbit team of six shuttle and three ISS crew members who together will complete the S1 truss installation. The trajectory continues beyond the ISS, ending in a six-pointed star representing the Atlantis and the STS-112 crew.

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4" / 100mm
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STS-110 - 4" - Unknown maker

STS-110 was a Space Shuttle mission to the International Space Station (ISS) on 8–19 April 2002 flown by Space Shuttle Atlantis. The main purpose was to install the S0 Truss segment, which forms the backbone of the truss structure on the station.
The main purpose of STS-110 was to attach the S0 Truss segment to the International Space Station (ISS) to the Destiny Laboratory Module. It forms the backbone of the station to which the S1 and P1 truss segments were attached (on the following missions STS-112 and STS-113, respectively).
STS-110 also delivered the Mobile Transporter (MT), which is an 885 kilograms (1,950 lb) (1,950 lb) assembly that glides down rails on the station integrated trusses. During the next shuttle mission, STS-111, the Mobile Base System (MBS) was mounted to the MT. This Mobile Servicing System (MSS) allows the Canadarm2 to travel down the length of the installed truss structure.

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4" / 100mm
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STS-110 - 4" - A-B Emblem

STS-110 was a Space Shuttle mission to the International Space Station (ISS) on 8–19 April 2002 flown by Space Shuttle Atlantis. The main purpose was to install the S0 Truss segment, which forms the backbone of the truss structure on the station.
The main purpose of STS-110 was to attach the S0 Truss segment to the International Space Station (ISS) to the Destiny Laboratory Module. It forms the backbone of the station to which the S1 and P1 truss segments were attached (on the following missions STS-112 and STS-113, respectively).
STS-110 also delivered the Mobile Transporter (MT), which is an 885 kilograms (1,950 lb) (1,950 lb) assembly that glides down rails on the station integrated trusses. During the next shuttle mission, STS-111, the Mobile Base System (MBS) was mounted to the MT. This Mobile Servicing System (MSS) allows the Canadarm2 to travel down the length of the installed truss structure.

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4" / 100mm
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STS-104 - 4"- A-B Emblem

STS-104 was a Space Shuttle mission to the International Space Station (ISS) flown by Space Shuttle Atlantis. Its primary objectives were to install the Quest Joint Airlock and help perform maintenance on the International Space Station. It was successful and returned to Earth without incident, after a successful docking, equipment installation and three spacewalks.
The primary purpose of the flight was to deliver and install the Quest airlock. The Joint Airlock is a pressurized flight element consisting of two cylindrical chambers attached end-to-end by a connecting bulkhead and hatch. Once installed and activated, the ISS airlock became the primary path for International Space Station space walk entry and departure for U.S. spacesuits, which are known as Extravehicular Mobility Units, or EMUs. In addition, the Joint Airlock is designed to support the Russian Orlan spacesuit for EVA activity.

 This patch depicts the launch of Space Shuttle Atlantis and the successful completion of the mission objectives as signified by the view of the ISS with the airlock installed. The astronaut symbol is displayed behind Atlantis as a tribute to the many crews that have flown before. The hard work, dedication, and teamwork of the airlock team is represented by the ISS components inside the payload bay which include the Joint Airlock and four high pressure gas tanks containing nitrogen and oxygen. In the words of a STS-104 crew spokesperson, "The stars and stripes background is symbolic of the commitment of a nation to this challenging international endeavor and to our children who represent its future." The NASA insignia design for Shuttle flights is reserved for use by the astronauts and for other official use as the NASA Administrator may authorize. Public availability has been approved only in the form of illustrations by the various news media. When and if there is any change in this policy, which is not anticipated, it will be publicly announced.

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4" / 100mm
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STS-98 - 4" - A-B Emblem

STS-98 was a 2001 Space Shuttle mission to the International Space Station (ISS) flown by Space Shuttle Atlantis. STS-98 delivered to the station the Destiny Laboratory Module. All mission objectives were completed and the shuttle reentered and landed safely at Edwards Air Force Base on 20 February 2001.

The crew patch depicts the Space Shuttle with Destiny held high above the payload bay just before its attachment to the ISS. Red and white stripes, with a deep blue field of white stars, border the Shuttle and Destiny to symbolize the continuing contribution of the United States to the ISS. The constellation Hercules, seen just below Destiny, captures the Shuttle and Station's team efforts in bringing the promise of orbital scientific research to life. The reflection of Earth in Destiny's window emphasizes the connection between space exploration and life on Earthafter twelve days in space, six of which were spent docked to the ISS.

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4" / 100mm
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STS-106 - 4" - A-B Emblem

STS-106 was a Space Shuttle mission to the International Space Station (ISS) flown by Space Shuttle Atlantis. Space Station assembly flight ISS-2A.2b utilized the SPACEHAB Double Module and the Integrated Cargo Carrier (ICC) to bring supplies to the station. The mission also included two spacewalks.

Zvezda is depicted on the crew patch mated with the already orbiting Node 1 Unity module and Russian-built Functional Cargo Block, called Zarya (sunrise), with a Progress supply vehicle docked to the rear of the Station. The International Space Station is shown in orbit with Earth above as it appears from the perspective of space. The Astronaut Office symbol, a star with three rays of light, provides a connection between the Space Shuttle Atlantis and the Space Station, much the same as the Space Shuttle Program is linked to the International Space Station during its construction and future research operations. Stylized versions of flags from Russia and the United States meet at the Space Station. They symbolize both the cooperation and joint efforts of the two countries during the development and deployment of the permanent outpost in space as well as the close relationship of the American and Russian crew members.

Size: 
4" / 100mm
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STS-101 - 4" - Original Crew "Banded" - Unknown maker

STS-101 was a Space Shuttle mission to the International Space Station (ISS) flown by Space Shuttle Atlantis. The mission was a 10-day mission conducted between 19 May 2000 and 29 May 2000. The mission was designated 2A.2a and was a resupply mission to the International Space Station. STS-101 was delayed 3 times in April due to high winds. STS-101 traveled 4.1 million miles and completed 155 revolutions of the earth and landed on runway 15 at Kennedy Space Center. The mission was the first to fly with the "glass cockpit".

Cosmonauts Yuri I. Malenchenko and Boris V. Morukov, along with astronaut Edward T. Lu were moved to STS-106. Astronauts James S. Voss and Susan J. Helms, and cosmonaut Yury V. Usachev were added to the STS-101 crew. Malenchenko, Morukov and Usachev all represent the Russian Space Agency (RSA).

There are at least 3 variations of the STS-101 patch:

  • Internal wingtip (the wingtip is inside the oval of the patch)
  • External wingtip (the wingtip extends beyond the oval of the patch)
  • "Banded" - the red, white and blue dither is a banded stitch

 

This STS-101 patch is a bit of an enigma. It is slightly smaller than the common souvenir version and has a distinct banding of the bottom red, white and blue striping where the others are "notched". It does not appear to be a limitation of the stitching, as the rest of the patch bears identical detail on the ISS modules as the larger versions. This version appears on eBay infrequently and I would classify this as "scarce".

 

Size: 
3.75" / 95mm
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STS-101 - 4" - Original Crew "External Wing" - A-B Emblem

STS-101 was a Space Shuttle mission to the International Space Station (ISS) flown by Space Shuttle Atlantis. The mission was a 10-day mission conducted between 19 May 2000 and 29 May 2000. The mission was designated 2A.2a and was a resupply mission to the International Space Station. STS-101 was delayed 3 times in April due to high winds. STS-101 traveled 4.1 million miles and completed 155 revolutions of the earth and landed on runway 15 at Kennedy Space Center. The mission was the first to fly with the "glass cockpit".

Cosmonauts Yuri I. Malenchenko and Boris V. Morukov, along with astronaut Edward T. Lu were moved to STS-106. Astronauts James S. Voss and Susan J. Helms, and cosmonaut Yury V. Usachev were added to the STS-101 crew. Malenchenko, Morukov and Usachev all represent the Russian Space Agency (RSA).

There are at least 3 variations of the STS-101 patch:

  • Internal wingtip (the wingtip is inside the oval of the patch)
  • External wingtip (the wingtip extends beyond the oval of the patch)
  • "Banded" - the red, white and blue dither is a banded stitch

 

Size: 
4" / 100mm
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STS-101 - 4" - Original Crew "Internal Wing" - A-B Emblem

STS-101 was a Space Shuttle mission to the International Space Station (ISS) flown by Space Shuttle Atlantis. The mission was a 10-day mission conducted between 19 May 2000 and 29 May 2000. The mission was designated 2A.2a and was a resupply mission to the International Space Station. STS-101 was delayed 3 times in April due to high winds. STS-101 traveled 4.1 million miles and completed 155 revolutions of the earth and landed on runway 15 at Kennedy Space Center. The mission was the first to fly with the "glass cockpit".

Cosmonauts Yuri I. Malenchenko and Boris V. Morukov, along with astronaut Edward T. Lu were moved to STS-106. Astronauts James S. Voss and Susan J. Helms, and cosmonaut Yury V. Usachev were added to the STS-101 crew. Malenchenko, Morukov and Usachev all represent the Russian Space Agency (RSA).

There are at least 3 variations of the STS-101 patch:

  • Internal wingtip (the wingtip is inside the oval of the patch)
  • External wingtip (the wingtip extends beyond the oval of the patch)
  • "Banded" - the red, white and blue dither is a banded stitch

 

Size: 
4" / 100mm
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STS-86 - 4" - Unknown Maker (No Wolf)

STS-86 was a Space Shuttle Atlantis mission to the Mir space station. This was the last Atlantis mission before it was taken out of service temporarily for maintenance and upgrades, including the glass cockpit.

The seventh Mir Docking mission carried a SPACEHAB double module for the docking with Mir, cargo transfer and an astronaut exchange.
Highlights of the 10 day mission include five days of docked operations between Atlantis and Mir and the exchange of crew members Foale and Wolf to continue a permanent American presence of the Russia complex. A spacewalk is scheduled to retrieve the four Mir Environmental Effects Payloads which were attached to the Mir's docking module by Linda Godwin and Rich Clifford during STS-76 to characterize the environment surrounding the Mir space station. Atlantis will carry the SPACEHAB double module to support the transfer of logistics and supplies for Mir and the return of experiment hardware and specimens to Earth.
There is thick white stitching outlining the "stars" stripe below the globe. No Wolf tab. 

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4" / 100mm
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STS-86 - 4" - Unknown Maker (Russian source)

STS-86 was a Space Shuttle Atlantis mission to the Mir space station. This was the last Atlantis mission before it was taken out of service temporarily for maintenance and upgrades, including the glass cockpit.

The seventh Mir Docking mission carried a SPACEHAB double module for the docking with Mir, cargo transfer and an astronaut exchange.
Highlights of the 10 day mission include five days of docked operations between Atlantis and Mir and the exchange of crew members Foale and Wolf to continue a permanent American presence of the Russia complex. A spacewalk is scheduled to retrieve the four Mir Environmental Effects Payloads which were attached to the Mir's docking module by Linda Godwin and Rich Clifford during STS-76 to characterize the environment surrounding the Mir space station. Atlantis will carry the SPACEHAB double module to support the transfer of logistics and supplies for Mir and the return of experiment hardware and specimens to Earth.
There is white thread outlining the "stars" stripe below the globe. Cut edge, integrated, not sewn-on tab.
Sold from Russia.

Size: 
4" / 100mm
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STS-86 - 4" - Unknown Maker (No Wolf)

STS-86 was a Space Shuttle Atlantis mission to the Mir space station. This was the last Atlantis mission before it was taken out of service temporarily for maintenance and upgrades, including the glass cockpit.

The seventh Mir Docking mission carried a SPACEHAB double module for the docking with Mir, cargo transfer and an astronaut exchange.
Highlights of the 10 day mission include five days of docked operations between Atlantis and Mir and the exchange of crew members Foale and Wolf to continue a permanent American presence of the Russia complex. A spacewalk is scheduled to retrieve the four Mir Environmental Effects Payloads which were attached to the Mir's docking module by Linda Godwin and Rich Clifford during STS-76 to characterize the environment surrounding the Mir space station. Atlantis will carry the SPACEHAB double module to support the transfer of logistics and supplies for Mir and the return of experiment hardware and specimens to Earth.
There is white dashed thread outlining the "stars" stripe below the globe.
This version is lacking the "Wolf" tab (added to the crew manifest later). 

Size: 
4" / 100mm
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