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TMA-11M - 4" - TsENKI

Soyuz TMA-11M was a 2013 flight to the International Space Station. It transported three members of the Expedition 38 crew to the International Space Station. TMA-11M is the 120th flight of a Soyuz spacecraft, with the first flight launching in 1967. The successful docking of the Soyuz TMA-11M spacecraft on November 7, 2013 marked the first time since October 2009 that nine people have resided on the space station without the presence of a space shuttle.
 
The rocket and spacecraft applied Olympic symbols on the cowl of the ship. During mission, the Olympic torch has been passed for the first time in open space, Russian cosmonauts Oleg Kotov and Sergey Ryazansky passed it at the outlet of the International Space Station.
 
Like Tyurin's earlier Soyuz TMA-9 patch, this design features the MAI 6th logo — the faculty of the Moscow Aviation Institute that he graduated from. Also pictured is an Olympic flame, for this flight will deliver to the ISS the Sochi 2014 torch.
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TMA-11M Backup Crew - 4" - Spacepatches.nl

Soyuz TMA-11M was a 2013 flight to the International Space Station. It transported three members of the Expedition 38 crew to the International Space Station. TMA-11M is the 120th flight of a Soyuz spacecraft, with the first flight launching in 1967. The successful docking of the Soyuz TMA-11M spacecraft on November 7, 2013 marked the first time since October 2009 that nine people have resided on the space station without the presence of a space shuttle.
 
The rocket and spacecraft applied Olympic symbols on the cowl of the ship. During mission, the Olympic torch has been passed for the first time in open space, Russian cosmonauts Oleg Kotov and Sergey Ryazansky passed it at the outlet of the International Space Station.
 
Like Tyurin's earlier Soyuz TMA-9 patch, this design features the MAI 6th logo — the faculty of the Moscow Aviation Institute that he graduated from. Also pictured is an Olympic flame, for this flight will deliver to the ISS the Sochi 2014 torch.
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4" / 100mm
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TMA-11M - 4" - Spacepatches.nl

Soyuz TMA-11M was a 2013 flight to the International Space Station. It transported three members of the Expedition 38 crew to the International Space Station. TMA-11M is the 120th flight of a Soyuz spacecraft, with the first flight launching in 1967. The successful docking of the Soyuz TMA-11M spacecraft on November 7, 2013 marked the first time since October 2009 that nine people have resided on the space station without the presence of a space shuttle.
 
The rocket and spacecraft applied Olympic symbols on the cowl of the ship. During mission, the Olympic torch has been passed for the first time in open space, Russian cosmonauts Oleg Kotov and Sergey Ryazansky passed it at the outlet of the International Space Station.
 
Like Tyurin's earlier Soyuz TMA-9 patch, this design features the MAI 6th logo — the faculty of the Moscow Aviation Institute that he graduated from. Also pictured is an Olympic flame, for this flight will deliver to the ISS the Sochi 2014 torch.
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4" / 100mm
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ISS Expedition 39 - TsENKI

Expedition 39 is scheduled to be the 39th expedition to the International Space Station. It will also mark the first time the ISS is under command of a Japanese astronaut, space veteran Koichi Wakata. After Expedition 21 in 2009 and Expedition 35 in 2013, it will be only the third time an ISS-crew is led neither by a NASA nor a RSA crew member.

This patch was produced for Center for operation of space ground-based infrastructure (TsENKI) in Baikonur and are difficult to find.

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ISS Expedition 39 - A-B Emblem

Expedition 39 is scheduled to be the 39th expedition to the International Space Station. It will also mark the first time the ISS is under command of a Japanese astronaut, space veteran Koichi Wakata. After Expedition 21 in 2009 and Expedition 35 in 2013, it will be only the third time an ISS-crew is led neither by a NASA nor a RSA crew member.

 

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Expedition 38 - TsENKI

Expedition 38 is the 38th expedition to the International Space Station.

This patch was produced for Center for operation of space ground-based infrastructure (TsENKI) in Baikonur and are difficult to find.

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5" / 128mm
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Expedition 38 - A-B Emblem

Expedition 38 is the 38th expedition to the International Space Station.

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STS-131 - 4" - Bama Space Patches

STS-131 (ISS assembly flight 19A) was a NASA Space Shuttle mission to the International Space Station (ISS). Space Shuttle Discovery launched on 5 April 2010 at 6:21 am from Kennedy Space Center's launch pad 39A, and landed at 9:08 am on 20 April 2010 on runway 33 at the Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility. The mission marked the longest flight for space shuttle Discovery.
The primary payload was a Multi-Purpose Logistics Module loaded with supplies and equipment for the International Space Station. The mission also removed and replaced an ammonia tank assembly outside the station on the S1 truss. STS-131 furthermore carried several on-board payloads; this mission had the most payloads since STS-107.

The STS-131/19A crew patch highlights the Space Shuttle in the Rendezvous Pitch Maneuver (RPM). This maneuver is heavily photographed by the International Space Station (ISS) astronauts, and the photos are analyzed back on earth to clear the Space Shuttle's thermal protection system for re-entry. The RPM illustrates the teamwork and safety process behind each Space Shuttle launch. In the Space Shuttle's cargo bay is the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM), Leonardo, which is carrying several science racks, the last of the four crew quarters, and supplies for the ISS. Out of view and directly behind the MPLM, is the Ammonia Tank Assembly (ATA) that will be used to replace the current ATA. This will take place during three Extra Vehicular Activities (EVAs). The 51.6° Space Shuttle orbit is illustrated by the three gold bars of the astronaut symbol, and its elliptical wreath contains the orbit of the ISS. The star atop the astronaut symbol is the dawning sun, which is spreading its early light across the Earth. The background star field contains seven stars, one for each crewmember; they are proud to represent the United States and Japan during this mission.

This STS-131 patch is the second patch from Bama Space Patches.

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STS-131 - 4" - A-B Emblem

STS-131 (ISS assembly flight 19A) was a NASA Space Shuttle mission to the International Space Station (ISS). Space Shuttle Discovery launched on 5 April 2010 at 6:21 am from Kennedy Space Center's launch pad 39A, and landed at 9:08 am on 20 April 2010 on runway 33 at the Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility. The mission marked the longest flight for space shuttle Discovery.
The primary payload was a Multi-Purpose Logistics Module loaded with supplies and equipment for the International Space Station. The mission also removed and replaced an ammonia tank assembly outside the station on the S1 truss. STS-131 furthermore carried several on-board payloads; this mission had the most payloads since STS-107.

The STS-131/19A crew patch highlights the Space Shuttle in the Rendezvous Pitch Maneuver (RPM). This maneuver is heavily photographed by the International Space Station (ISS) astronauts, and the photos are analyzed back on earth to clear the Space Shuttle's thermal protection system for re-entry. The RPM illustrates the teamwork and safety process behind each Space Shuttle launch. In the Space Shuttle's cargo bay is the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM), Leonardo, which is carrying several science racks, the last of the four crew quarters, and supplies for the ISS. Out of view and directly behind the MPLM, is the Ammonia Tank Assembly (ATA) that will be used to replace the current ATA. This will take place during three Extra Vehicular Activities (EVAs). The 51.6° Space Shuttle orbit is illustrated by the three gold bars of the astronaut symbol, and its elliptical wreath contains the orbit of the ISS. The star atop the astronaut symbol is the dawning sun, which is spreading its early light across the Earth. The background star field contains seven stars, one for each crewmember; they are proud to represent the United States and Japan during this mission.

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4" / 100mm
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STS-118 - 4" - "Anderson" - Unknown maker

STS-118 was a space shuttle mission to the International Space Station (ISS) flown by the orbiter Endeavour. STS-118 successfully lifted off on 8 August 2007 from launch pad 39A at Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida and landed at the Shuttle Landing Facility at KSC on 21 August 2007.
It was the first flight of Endeavour since the STS-113 mission in November 2002, which was the last successful Space Shuttle flight before the loss of Columbia on STS-107. STS-118 pilot Charles Hobaugh had been the entry team CAPCOM for STS-107. Had Columbia not disintegrated, it would have been chosen for this mission,[4] which would have been its 29th mission, and probably its only mission to the ISS.
The mission is also referred to as ISS-13A.1 by the ISS program. The mission added two more components to the ISS as well as bringing supplies for its crew.

When Clayton Anderson was moved to STS-117 Drew was selected for the available position on STS-118. Randy Hunt produced versions with Anderson's name prior to the crew swap. A-B Emblem also has an STS-118 version with Anderson's name. This version was made by the same maker of the "Drew" version of this patch.

 

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STS-118 - 4" - A-B Emblem "Anderson"

STS-118 was a space shuttle mission to the International Space Station (ISS) flown by the orbiter Endeavour. STS-118 successfully lifted off on 8 August 2007 from launch pad 39A at Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida and landed at the Shuttle Landing Facility at KSC on 21 August 2007.
It was the first flight of Endeavour since the STS-113 mission in November 2002, which was the last successful Space Shuttle flight before the loss of Columbia on STS-107. STS-118 pilot Charles Hobaugh had been the entry team CAPCOM for STS-107. Had Columbia not disintegrated, it would have been chosen for this mission,[4] which would have been its 29th mission, and probably its only mission to the ISS.
The mission is also referred to as ISS-13A.1 by the ISS program. The mission added two more components to the ISS as well as bringing supplies for its crew.

When Clayton Anderson was moved to STS-117 Drew was selected for the available position on STS-118. A-B Emblem released a limited number of versions with Anderson's name prior to the crew swap.

 

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4" / 100mm
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STS-118 - 4" - Unknown maker

STS-118 was a space shuttle mission to the International Space Station (ISS) flown by the orbiter Endeavour. STS-118 successfully lifted off on 8 August 2007 from launch pad 39A at Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida and landed at the Shuttle Landing Facility at KSC on 21 August 2007.
It was the first flight of Endeavour since the STS-113 mission in November 2002, which was the last successful Space Shuttle flight before the loss of Columbia on STS-107. STS-118 pilot Charles Hobaugh had been the entry team CAPCOM for STS-107. Had Columbia not disintegrated, it would have been chosen for this mission,[4] which would have been its 29th mission, and probably its only mission to the ISS.
The mission is also referred to as ISS-13A.1 by the ISS program. The mission added two more components to the ISS as well as bringing supplies for its crew.

This STS-118 patch is virtually identical to the A-B Emblem version, however the red lettering is slightly thicker and the "Drew" is slightly higher with relation to the ISS. This maker of this patch also made a version with "Anderson"

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4" / 100mm
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STS-118 - 4" - A-B Emblem

STS-118 was a space shuttle mission to the International Space Station (ISS) flown by the orbiter Endeavour. STS-118 successfully lifted off on 8 August 2007 from launch pad 39A at Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida and landed at the Shuttle Landing Facility at KSC on 21 August 2007.
It was the first flight of Endeavour since the STS-113 mission in November 2002, which was the last successful Space Shuttle flight before the loss of Columbia on STS-107. STS-118 pilot Charles Hobaugh had been the entry team CAPCOM for STS-107. Had Columbia not disintegrated, it would have been chosen for this mission,[4] which would have been its 29th mission, and probably its only mission to the ISS.
The mission is also referred to as ISS-13A.1 by the ISS program. The mission added two more components to the ISS as well as bringing supplies for its crew.

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4" / 100mm
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STS-117 - 4" - Original Crew - A-B Emblem

Scheduled for launch on October 2, 2003, the shuttle Endeavour was to have delivered the S3/S4 truss segment to the International Space Station. No landing date was announced yet, however. The crew would've consisted of 6 astronauts due to the weight of the truss segment: Commander Rick Sturckow, Pilot Mark Polansky, and Mission Specialists Jim Reilly, Pat Forrester, Rick Mastracchio, and Joan Higginbotham. The Columbia disaster later cancelled the flight and some of the crew had to wait until June 2007 when 4 other crew members joined Sturckow, Reilly, and Forrester: Lee Archambault, Steve Swanson, John Olivas, and Clay Anderson. Anderson was to join the then-current expedition aboard the outpost and Sunita Williams was to land with the replacement shuttle for the remanifested STS-117: Atlantis.

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STS-106 - 4" - A-B Emblem

STS-106 was a Space Shuttle mission to the International Space Station (ISS) flown by Space Shuttle Atlantis. Space Station assembly flight ISS-2A.2b utilized the SPACEHAB Double Module and the Integrated Cargo Carrier (ICC) to bring supplies to the station. The mission also included two spacewalks.

Zvezda is depicted on the crew patch mated with the already orbiting Node 1 Unity module and Russian-built Functional Cargo Block, called Zarya (sunrise), with a Progress supply vehicle docked to the rear of the Station. The International Space Station is shown in orbit with Earth above as it appears from the perspective of space. The Astronaut Office symbol, a star with three rays of light, provides a connection between the Space Shuttle Atlantis and the Space Station, much the same as the Space Shuttle Program is linked to the International Space Station during its construction and future research operations. Stylized versions of flags from Russia and the United States meet at the Space Station. They symbolize both the cooperation and joint efforts of the two countries during the development and deployment of the permanent outpost in space as well as the close relationship of the American and Russian crew members.

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4" / 100mm
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