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wakata

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TMA-11M - 4" - TsENKI

Soyuz TMA-11M was a 2013 flight to the International Space Station. It transported three members of the Expedition 38 crew to the International Space Station. TMA-11M is the 120th flight of a Soyuz spacecraft, with the first flight launching in 1967. The successful docking of the Soyuz TMA-11M spacecraft on November 7, 2013 marked the first time since October 2009 that nine people have resided on the space station without the presence of a space shuttle.
 
The rocket and spacecraft applied Olympic symbols on the cowl of the ship. During mission, the Olympic torch has been passed for the first time in open space, Russian cosmonauts Oleg Kotov and Sergey Ryazansky passed it at the outlet of the International Space Station.
 
Like Tyurin's earlier Soyuz TMA-9 patch, this design features the MAI 6th logo — the faculty of the Moscow Aviation Institute that he graduated from. Also pictured is an Olympic flame, for this flight will deliver to the ISS the Sochi 2014 torch.
Size: 
4" / 100mm
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TMA-11M Backup Crew - 4" - Spacepatches.nl

Soyuz TMA-11M was a 2013 flight to the International Space Station. It transported three members of the Expedition 38 crew to the International Space Station. TMA-11M is the 120th flight of a Soyuz spacecraft, with the first flight launching in 1967. The successful docking of the Soyuz TMA-11M spacecraft on November 7, 2013 marked the first time since October 2009 that nine people have resided on the space station without the presence of a space shuttle.
 
The rocket and spacecraft applied Olympic symbols on the cowl of the ship. During mission, the Olympic torch has been passed for the first time in open space, Russian cosmonauts Oleg Kotov and Sergey Ryazansky passed it at the outlet of the International Space Station.
 
Like Tyurin's earlier Soyuz TMA-9 patch, this design features the MAI 6th logo — the faculty of the Moscow Aviation Institute that he graduated from. Also pictured is an Olympic flame, for this flight will deliver to the ISS the Sochi 2014 torch.
Size: 
4" / 100mm
Classification: 
Rating: 
0
No votes yet
Collector Value: 
0
No votes yet

TMA-11M - 4" - Spacepatches.nl

Soyuz TMA-11M was a 2013 flight to the International Space Station. It transported three members of the Expedition 38 crew to the International Space Station. TMA-11M is the 120th flight of a Soyuz spacecraft, with the first flight launching in 1967. The successful docking of the Soyuz TMA-11M spacecraft on November 7, 2013 marked the first time since October 2009 that nine people have resided on the space station without the presence of a space shuttle.
 
The rocket and spacecraft applied Olympic symbols on the cowl of the ship. During mission, the Olympic torch has been passed for the first time in open space, Russian cosmonauts Oleg Kotov and Sergey Ryazansky passed it at the outlet of the International Space Station.
 
Like Tyurin's earlier Soyuz TMA-9 patch, this design features the MAI 6th logo — the faculty of the Moscow Aviation Institute that he graduated from. Also pictured is an Olympic flame, for this flight will deliver to the ISS the Sochi 2014 torch.
Size: 
4" / 100mm
Classification: 
Rating: 
0
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Collector Value: 
0
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ISS Expedition 18 - 4" - Cape Kennedy Medals

Expedition 18 was the 18th permanent crew of the International Space Station (ISS). The first two crew members, Michael Fincke, and Yuri Lonchakov were launched on 12 October 2008, aboard Soyuz TMA-13. With them was astronaut Sandra Magnus, who joined the Expedition 18 crew after launching on STS-126 and remained until departing on STS-119 on 25 March 2009. She was replaced by JAXA astronaut Koichi Wakata, who arrived at the ISS on STS-119 on 17 March 2009. Gregory Chamitoff, who joined Expedition 18 after Expedition 17 left the station, ended his stay aboard ISS and returned to Earth with the STS-126 crew.

The Cape Kennedy Medals patch is virtually identical to the official A-B Emblem version.

Size: 
4" / 100mm
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Koichi Wakata Personal Patch - STS-92

Wakata became the first Japanese astronaut to work on the assembly of the International Space Station during STS-92. The crew attached the Z1 truss and Pressurized Mating Adapter (PMA3) to the station using Discovery’s robotic arm. STS-92 prepared the station for its first resident crew.

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Koishi Wakata Personal Patch - STS-72 - V2

NASDA astronaut Koishi Wakata on board STS-72 (and STS-85 and STS-92)
This patch has a cut edge, rather than merrowed. This is likely the official version.

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ISS Expedition 39 - TsENKI

Expedition 39 is scheduled to be the 39th expedition to the International Space Station. It will also mark the first time the ISS is under command of a Japanese astronaut, space veteran Koichi Wakata. After Expedition 21 in 2009 and Expedition 35 in 2013, it will be only the third time an ISS-crew is led neither by a NASA nor a RSA crew member.

This patch was produced for Center for operation of space ground-based infrastructure (TsENKI) in Baikonur and are difficult to find.

Size: 
4" / 100mm
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ISS Expedition 39 - A-B Emblem

Expedition 39 is scheduled to be the 39th expedition to the International Space Station. It will also mark the first time the ISS is under command of a Japanese astronaut, space veteran Koichi Wakata. After Expedition 21 in 2009 and Expedition 35 in 2013, it will be only the third time an ISS-crew is led neither by a NASA nor a RSA crew member.

 

Size: 
4" / 100mm
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Expedition 38 - TsENKI

Expedition 38 is the 38th expedition to the International Space Station.

This patch was produced for Center for operation of space ground-based infrastructure (TsENKI) in Baikonur and are difficult to find.

Size: 
5" / 128mm
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Expedition 38 - A-B Emblem

Expedition 38 is the 38th expedition to the International Space Station.

Size: 
5" / 128mm
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ISS Expedition 19 - A-B Emblem - With names

Expedition 19 was the 19th long-duration flight to the International Space Station. This expedition launched on 26 March 2009, at 11:49 UTC aboard the Soyuz TMA-14 spacecraft. Expedition 19 was the final three crew member expedition, before the crew size increased to six crew members with Expedition 20.
The expedition was commanded by Russian Air Force Colonel Gennady Padalka. On 31 March 2009, Padalka raised an issue concerning shared use of facilities such as exercise equipment and toilet facilities. Padalka claims that initial approval to use exercise equipment owned by the U.S. government was subsequently turned down. Russian and American members of the crew have now been informed to use only their own toilets and not to share rations. The result was a general lowering of morale on the station.

This A-B Emblem version features the crew member's names.

Size: 
4" / 100mm
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ISS Expedition 19 - A-B Emblem

Expedition 19 was the 19th long-duration flight to the International Space Station. This expedition launched on 26 March 2009, at 11:49 UTC aboard the Soyuz TMA-14 spacecraft. Expedition 19 was the final three crew member expedition, before the crew size increased to six crew members with Expedition 20.
The expedition was commanded by Russian Air Force Colonel Gennady Padalka. On 31 March 2009, Padalka raised an issue concerning shared use of facilities such as exercise equipment and toilet facilities. Padalka claims that initial approval to use exercise equipment owned by the U.S. government was subsequently turned down. Russian and American members of the crew have now been informed to use only their own toilets and not to share rations. The result was a general lowering of morale on the station.

This is the common A-B Emblem souvenir version.

Size: 
4" / 100mm
Project: 
Classification: 
Rating: 
0
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0
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ISS Expedition 18 - A-B Emblem - With names

Expedition 18 was the 18th permanent crew of the International Space Station (ISS). The first two crew members, Michael Fincke, and Yuri Lonchakov were launched on 12 October 2008, aboard Soyuz TMA-13. With them was astronaut Sandra Magnus, who joined the Expedition 18 crew after launching on STS-126 and remained until departing on STS-119 on 25 March 2009. She was replaced by JAXA astronaut Koichi Wakata, who arrived at the ISS on STS-119 on 17 March 2009. Gregory Chamitoff, who joined Expedition 18 after Expedition 17 left the station, ended his stay aboard ISS and returned to Earth with the STS-126 crew.

This version from A-B Emblem features the crew member's names. It is harder to find than the souvener version.

Size: 
4" / 100mm
Project: 
Classification: 
Rating: 
0
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0
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ISS Expedition 18 - A-B Emblem

Expedition 18 was the 18th permanent crew of the International Space Station (ISS). The first two crew members, Michael Fincke, and Yuri Lonchakov were launched on 12 October 2008, aboard Soyuz TMA-13. With them was astronaut Sandra Magnus, who joined the Expedition 18 crew after launching on STS-126 and remained until departing on STS-119 on 25 March 2009. She was replaced by JAXA astronaut Koichi Wakata, who arrived at the ISS on STS-119 on 17 March 2009. Gregory Chamitoff, who joined Expedition 18 after Expedition 17 left the station, ended his stay aboard ISS and returned to Earth with the STS-126 crew.

This is the common A-B Emblem souvenir version. 

Size: 
4" / 100mm
Project: 
Classification: 
Rating: 
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0
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STS-92 - 4" - 100th Flight Commemorative - Unknown maker

STS-92 was a Space Shuttle mission to the International Space Station (ISS) flown by Space Shuttle Discovery. STS-92 marked the 100th mission of the Space Shuttle. It was launched from Kennedy Space Center, Florida, 11 October 2000.
STS-92 was an ISS assembly flight that brought the Z1 truss, Control Moment Gyros, Pressurized Mating Adapter-3 (PMA-3) (mounted on a Spacelab pallet) and two DDCU (Heat pipes) to the space station.
The Z1 truss was the first exterior framework installed on the ISS and allowed the first U.S. solar arrays to be temporarily installed on Unity for early power during flight 4A. The Ku-band communication system supported early science capabilities and U.S. television on flight 6A. The CMGs (Control Moment Gyros) weigh about 27 kilograms (60 lb) and provide non-propulsive (electrically powered) attitude control when activated on flight 5A, and PMA-3 provides shuttle docking port for solar array installation on flight 4A and Lab installation on flight 5A.

 

Size: 
4" / 100mm
Rating: 
0
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0
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STS-92 - 4" - 100th Flight Commemorative - Unknown maker

STS-92 was a Space Shuttle mission to the International Space Station (ISS) flown by Space Shuttle Discovery. STS-92 marked the 100th mission of the Space Shuttle. It was launched from Kennedy Space Center, Florida, 11 October 2000.
STS-92 was an ISS assembly flight that brought the Z1 truss, Control Moment Gyros, Pressurized Mating Adapter-3 (PMA-3) (mounted on a Spacelab pallet) and two DDCU (Heat pipes) to the space station.
The Z1 truss was the first exterior framework installed on the ISS and allowed the first U.S. solar arrays to be temporarily installed on Unity for early power during flight 4A. The Ku-band communication system supported early science capabilities and U.S. television on flight 6A. The CMGs (Control Moment Gyros) weigh about 27 kilograms (60 lb) and provide non-propulsive (electrically powered) attitude control when activated on flight 5A, and PMA-3 provides shuttle docking port for solar array installation on flight 4A and Lab[clarification needed] installation on flight 5A.

This patch differs from the official STS-92 crew patch with its red border.

Size: 
4" / 100mm
Rating: 
0
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0
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STS-92 - 4" - Eagle Crest Emblem

STS-92 was a Space Shuttle mission to the International Space Station (ISS) flown by Space Shuttle Discovery. STS-92 marked the 100th mission of the Space Shuttle. It was launched from Kennedy Space Center, Florida, 11 October 2000.
STS-92 was an ISS assembly flight that brought the Z1 truss, Control Moment Gyros, Pressurized Mating Adapter-3 (PMA-3) (mounted on a Spacelab pallet) and two DDCU (Heat pipes) to the space station.
The Z1 truss was the first exterior framework installed on the ISS and allowed the first U.S. solar arrays to be temporarily installed on Unity for early power during flight 4A. The Ku-band communication system supported early science capabilities and U.S. television on flight 6A. The CMGs (Control Moment Gyros) weigh about 27 kilograms (60 lb) and provide non-propulsive (electrically powered) attitude control when activated on flight 5A, and PMA-3 provides shuttle docking port for solar array installation on flight 4A and Lab[clarification needed] installation on flight 5A.

Size: 
4" / 100mm
Classification: 
Rating: 
0
No votes yet
Collector Value: 
0
No votes yet

STS-92 - 4" - A-B Emblem

STS-92 was a Space Shuttle mission to the International Space Station (ISS) flown by Space Shuttle Discovery. STS-92 marked the 100th mission of the Space Shuttle. It was launched from Kennedy Space Center, Florida, 11 October 2000.
STS-92 was an ISS assembly flight that brought the Z1 truss, Control Moment Gyros, Pressurized Mating Adapter-3 (PMA-3) (mounted on a Spacelab pallet) and two DDCU (Heat pipes) to the space station.
The Z1 truss was the first exterior framework installed on the ISS and allowed the first U.S. solar arrays to be temporarily installed on Unity for early power during flight 4A. The Ku-band communication system supported early science capabilities and U.S. television on flight 6A. The CMGs (Control Moment Gyros) weigh about 27 kilograms (60 lb) and provide non-propulsive (electrically powered) attitude control when activated on flight 5A, and PMA-3 provides shuttle docking port for solar array installation on flight 4A and Lab[clarification needed] installation on flight 5A.

Size: 
4" / 100mm
Classification: 
Rating: 
0
No votes yet
Collector Value: 
0
No votes yet

STS-72 - 4" - Eagle Crest Emblem

STS-72 was a Space Shuttle Endeavour mission to capture and return to Earth a Japanese microgravity research spacecraft known as Space Flyer Unit (SFU). The mission launched from Kennedy Space Center, Florida on 11 January 1996.
STS-72, the 74th flight of the Space Shuttle program and the 10th of the orbiter Endeavour was launched at 4:41AM EST January 11, 1996 after a brief delay due to communication issues. The nighttime launch window was in support of the mission's primary objective, the capture and return to Earth of a Japanese microgravity research spacecraft known as Space Flyer Unit (SFU). The 3,577 kilograms (7,890 lb) SFU was launched by Japan's National Space Development Agency (NASDA) from Tanegashima Space Center in Japan on 18 March 1995 aboard a Japanese H-II rocket (HII-3), and spent ten months in orbit conducting automated research in materials science, biology, engineering, and astronomy. Mission Specialist Koichi Wakata operated the orbiter's remote manipulator system arm on flight day three to pluck SFU from orbit. Both of the satellites's solar arrays had to be jettisoned prior to retrieval when sensors indicated improper latching following their retraction. This jettison procedure had been incorporated in preflight training as a contingency in the event of such an occurrence. The canisters housing the arrays were jettisoned 12 minutes apart as Endeavour and the SFU traveled across Africa on the thirtieth orbit of the mission. The contingency procedure delayed the capture of the satellite by about an hour and half. Once in Endeavour's payload bay, the satellite's internal batteries were bypassed following connection of a remotely operated electrical cable to the side of the satellite.

The Eagle Crest Emblem STS-72 version has slightly more detail than the A-B Emblem version, particularly with regards to the astronaut. 

Size: 
4" / 100mm
Project: 
Classification: 
Rating: 
0
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0
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STS-72 - 4" - A-B Emblem

STS-72 was a Space Shuttle Endeavour mission to capture and return to Earth a Japanese microgravity research spacecraft known as Space Flyer Unit (SFU). The mission launched from Kennedy Space Center, Florida on 11 January 1996.
STS-72, the 74th flight of the Space Shuttle program and the 10th of the orbiter Endeavour was launched at 4:41AM EST January 11, 1996 after a brief delay due to communication issues. The nighttime launch window was in support of the mission's primary objective, the capture and return to Earth of a Japanese microgravity research spacecraft known as Space Flyer Unit (SFU). The 3,577 kilograms (7,890 lb) SFU was launched by Japan's National Space Development Agency (NASDA) from Tanegashima Space Center in Japan on 18 March 1995 aboard a Japanese H-II rocket (HII-3), and spent ten months in orbit conducting automated research in materials science, biology, engineering, and astronomy. Mission Specialist Koichi Wakata operated the orbiter's remote manipulator system arm on flight day three to pluck SFU from orbit. Both of the satellites's solar arrays had to be jettisoned prior to retrieval when sensors indicated improper latching following their retraction. This jettison procedure had been incorporated in preflight training as a contingency in the event of such an occurrence. The canisters housing the arrays were jettisoned 12 minutes apart as Endeavour and the SFU traveled across Africa on the thirtieth orbit of the mission. The contingency procedure delayed the capture of the satellite by about an hour and half. Once in Endeavour's payload bay, the satellite's internal batteries were bypassed following connection of a remotely operated electrical cable to the side of the satellite.

Size: 
4" / 100mm
Project: 
Classification: 
Rating: 
0
No votes yet
Collector Value: 
0
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Koishi Wakata Personal Patch - STS-72 - V1

NASDA astronaut Koishi Wakata on board STS-72 (and STS-85 and STS-92)

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