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ISS Expedition 20 - A-B Emblem - With Names

Expedition 20 was the 20th long-duration flight to the International Space Station. The expedition marked the first time a six-member crew inhabited the station. Because each Soyuz-TMA spacecraft could hold only three people, two separate launches were necessary: Soyuz TMA-14 launched on 26 March 2009, and Soyuz TMA-15 followed on 27 May 2009.
Soyuz TMA-15 launched from Baikonur Cosmodrome at 10:34 UTC on 27 May 2009. The vehicle docked with the station on 29 May 2009, officially changing the Soyuz TMA-14 crew from Expedition 19 to Expedition 20.
Gennady Padalka was the first commander of a six-member station crew, and the first commander of two consecutive expeditions (Expedition 19 and 20). Nicole Stott was the final expedition astronaut to be launched on the shuttle.

This version of the A-B Emblem patch features the crew members' names.

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ISS Expedition 20 - A-B Emblem

Expedition 20 was the 20th long-duration flight to the International Space Station. The expedition marked the first time a six-member crew inhabited the station. Because each Soyuz-TMA spacecraft could hold only three people, two separate launches were necessary: Soyuz TMA-14 launched on 26 March 2009, and Soyuz TMA-15 followed on 27 May 2009.
Soyuz TMA-15 launched from Baikonur Cosmodrome at 10:34 UTC on 27 May 2009. The vehicle docked with the station on 29 May 2009, officially changing the Soyuz TMA-14 crew from Expedition 19 to Expedition 20.
Gennady Padalka was the first commander of a six-member station crew, and the first commander of two consecutive expeditions (Expedition 19 and 20). Nicole Stott was the final expedition astronaut to be launched on the shuttle.

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ISS Expedition 19 - A-B Emblem - With names

Expedition 19 was the 19th long-duration flight to the International Space Station. This expedition launched on 26 March 2009, at 11:49 UTC aboard the Soyuz TMA-14 spacecraft. Expedition 19 was the final three crew member expedition, before the crew size increased to six crew members with Expedition 20.
The expedition was commanded by Russian Air Force Colonel Gennady Padalka. On 31 March 2009, Padalka raised an issue concerning shared use of facilities such as exercise equipment and toilet facilities. Padalka claims that initial approval to use exercise equipment owned by the U.S. government was subsequently turned down. Russian and American members of the crew have now been informed to use only their own toilets and not to share rations. The result was a general lowering of morale on the station.

This A-B Emblem version features the crew member's names.

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ISS Expedition 19 - A-B Emblem

Expedition 19 was the 19th long-duration flight to the International Space Station. This expedition launched on 26 March 2009, at 11:49 UTC aboard the Soyuz TMA-14 spacecraft. Expedition 19 was the final three crew member expedition, before the crew size increased to six crew members with Expedition 20.
The expedition was commanded by Russian Air Force Colonel Gennady Padalka. On 31 March 2009, Padalka raised an issue concerning shared use of facilities such as exercise equipment and toilet facilities. Padalka claims that initial approval to use exercise equipment owned by the U.S. government was subsequently turned down. Russian and American members of the crew have now been informed to use only their own toilets and not to share rations. The result was a general lowering of morale on the station.

This is the common A-B Emblem souvenir version.

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STS-133 - 4" - Bama Space Patches

STS-133 (ISS assembly flight ULF5) was the 133rd mission in NASA's Space Shuttle program; during the mission, Space Shuttle Discovery docked with the International Space Station. It was Discovery's 39th and final mission. The mission launched on 24 February 2011, and landed on 9 March 2011. The crew consisted of six American astronauts, all of whom had been on prior spaceflights, headed by Commander Steven Lindsey. The crew joined the long-duration six person crew of Expedition 26, who were already aboard the space station. 

The STS-133 mission patch is based upon sketches from the late artist Robert McCall; they were the final creations of his long and prodigious career. In the foreground, a solitary orbiter ascends into a dark blue sky above a roiling fiery plume. A spray of stars surrounds the orbiter and a top lit crescent forms the background behind the ascent. The mission number, STS-133, is emblazoned on the patch center, and crewmembers' names are listed on a sky-blue border around the scene. The Shuttle Discovery is depicted ascending on a plume of flame as if it is just beginning a mission. However it is just the orbiter, without boosters or an external tank, as it would be at mission's end. This is to signify Discovery's completion of its operational life and the beginning of its new role as a symbol of NASA's and the nation's proud legacy in human spaceflight.

This version was sourced with other distinct reproductions from an eBay seller "Bama Space Patches". 

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STS-133 - 4" - A-B Emblem

STS-133 (ISS assembly flight ULF5) was the 133rd mission in NASA's Space Shuttle program; during the mission, Space Shuttle Discovery docked with the International Space Station. It was Discovery's 39th and final mission. The mission launched on 24 February 2011, and landed on 9 March 2011. The crew consisted of six American astronauts, all of whom had been on prior spaceflights, headed by Commander Steven Lindsey. The crew joined the long-duration six person crew of Expedition 26, who were already aboard the space station. 

The STS-133 mission patch is based upon sketches from the late artist Robert McCall; they were the final creations of his long and prodigious career. In the foreground, a solitary orbiter ascends into a dark blue sky above a roiling fiery plume. A spray of stars surrounds the orbiter and a top lit crescent forms the background behind the ascent. The mission number, STS-133, is emblazoned on the patch center, and crewmembers' names are listed on a sky-blue border around the scene. The Shuttle Discovery is depicted ascending on a plume of flame as if it is just beginning a mission. However it is just the orbiter, without boosters or an external tank, as it would be at mission's end. This is to signify Discovery's completion of its operational life and the beginning of its new role as a symbol of NASA's and the nation's proud legacy in human spaceflight.]

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STS-133 - 4" - A-B Emblem - "Kopra"

STS-133 (ISS assembly flight ULF5) was the 133rd mission in NASA's Space Shuttle program; during the mission, Space Shuttle Discovery docked with the International Space Station. It was Discovery's 39th and final mission. The mission launched on 24 February 2011, and landed on 9 March 2011. The crew consisted of six American astronauts, all of whom had been on prior spaceflights, headed by Commander Steven Lindsey. The crew joined the long-duration six person crew of Expedition 26, who were already aboard the space station. 

The STS-133 mission patch is based upon sketches from the late artist Robert McCall; they were the final creations of his long and prodigious career. In the foreground, a solitary orbiter ascends into a dark blue sky above a roiling fiery plume. A spray of stars surrounds the orbiter and a top lit crescent forms the background behind the ascent. The mission number, STS-133, is emblazoned on the patch center, and crewmembers' names are listed on a sky-blue border around the scene. The Shuttle Discovery is depicted ascending on a plume of flame as if it is just beginning a mission. However it is just the orbiter, without boosters or an external tank, as it would be at mission's end. This is to signify Discovery's completion of its operational life and the beginning of its new role as a symbol of NASA's and the nation's proud legacy in human spaceflight.]

About a month before lift-off, one of the original crew members, Tim Kopra, was injured in a bicycle accident. He was replaced by Stephen Bowen.

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Astronaut Class of 2000 - Group 18

Seventeen men and women have been selected for the astronaut
candidate class of 2000, scheduled to arrive at NASA's Johnson
Space Center, Houston, TX, in August to begin a period of 
training and evaluation.
     This year's class consists of seven pilot and 10 mission
specialist candidates.  Of the 17 class members, 14 are male and
three are female. 

Dominic A. Antonelli (Lt., USN)
Michael R. Barratt M.D.
Robert L. Behnken (Capt., USAF)
Eric A. Boe (Maj., USAF)
Stephen G. Bowen (Lt. Cmdr., USN)
B. Alvin Drew (Maj., USAF)
Andrew J. Feustel, Ph.D.
Kevin A. Ford (Lt. Col., USAF)
Ronald J. Garan, Jr. (Maj., USAF)
Michael T. Good (Maj., USAF)
Douglas G. Hurley (Maj., USMC)
Timothy L. Kopra (Maj., USA)
K. Megan McArthur
Karen L. Nyberg, Ph.D.
Nicole P. Stott
Terry W. Virts, Jr. (Capt., USAF)
Barry E. Wilmore (Lt. Cmdr., USN

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