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STS-132 - 4" - Unknown maker

STS-132 (ISS assembly flight ULF4) was a NASA Space Shuttle mission, during which Space Shuttle Atlantis docked with the International Space Station on 16 May 2010. STS-132 was launched from the Kennedy Space Center on 14 May 2010. The primary payload was the Russian Rassvet Mini-Research Module, along with an Integrated Cargo Carrier-Vertical Light Deployable (ICC-VLD). Atlantis landed at the Kennedy Space Center on 26 May 2010.
STS-132 was initially scheduled to be the final flight of Atlantis, provided that the STS-335/STS-135 Launch On Need rescue mission was not flown. However, in February 2011, NASA declared that the final mission of Atlantis and of the Space Shuttle program, STS-135, would be flown regardless of the funding situation.

The STS-132 mission patch features Atlantis flying off into the sunset as the end of the Space Shuttle Program approaches. However the sun is also heralding the promise of a new day as it rises for the first time on a new ISS module, the MRM-1, which is also named Rassvet, the Russian word for dawn.

This version of the STS-132 patch lacks the gold border around the Atlantis orbiter. It also has a cut edge.

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4" / 100mm
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STS-132 - 4" - A-B Emblem

STS-132 (ISS assembly flight ULF4) was a NASA Space Shuttle mission, during which Space Shuttle Atlantis docked with the International Space Station on 16 May 2010. STS-132 was launched from the Kennedy Space Center on 14 May 2010. The primary payload was the Russian Rassvet Mini-Research Module, along with an Integrated Cargo Carrier-Vertical Light Deployable (ICC-VLD). Atlantis landed at the Kennedy Space Center on 26 May 2010.
STS-132 was initially scheduled to be the final flight of Atlantis, provided that the STS-335/STS-135 Launch On Need rescue mission was not flown. However, in February 2011, NASA declared that the final mission of Atlantis and of the Space Shuttle program, STS-135, would be flown regardless of the funding situation.

The STS-132 mission patch features Atlantis flying off into the sunset as the end of the Space Shuttle Program approaches. However the sun is also heralding the promise of a new day as it rises for the first time on a new ISS module, the MRM-1, which is also named Rassvet, the Russian word for dawn.

Size: 
4" / 100mm
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STS-125 - 4" - Cape Kennedy Medals

STS-125, or HST-SM4 (Hubble Space Telescope Servicing Mission 4), was the fifth and final space shuttle servicing mission to the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Launch occurred on 11 May 2009 at 2:01 pm EDT. Landing occurred on 24 May at 11:39 am EDT, with the mission lasting a total of just under 13 days.
Space Shuttle Atlantis carried two new instruments to the Hubble Space Telescope, the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph and the Wide Field Camera 3. The mission also replaced a Fine Guidance Sensor, six gyroscopes, and two battery unit modules to allow the telescope to continue to function at least through 2014. The crew also installed new thermal blanket insulating panels to provide improved thermal protection, and a soft-capture mechanism that would aid in the safe de-orbiting of the telescope by an unmanned spacecraft at the end of its operational lifespan. The mission also carried an IMAX camera and the crew documented the progress of the mission for an upcoming IMAX movie.

This version has a thinner border around the solar panels of the HST and black for the panels themselves.

Size: 
4" / 100mm
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STS-125 - 4" - A-B Emblem

STS-125, or HST-SM4 (Hubble Space Telescope Servicing Mission 4), was the fifth and final space shuttle servicing mission to the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Launch occurred on 11 May 2009 at 2:01 pm EDT. Landing occurred on 24 May at 11:39 am EDT, with the mission lasting a total of just under 13 days.
Space Shuttle Atlantis carried two new instruments to the Hubble Space Telescope, the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph and the Wide Field Camera 3. The mission also replaced a Fine Guidance Sensor, six gyroscopes, and two battery unit modules to allow the telescope to continue to function at least through 2014. The crew also installed new thermal blanket insulating panels to provide improved thermal protection, and a soft-capture mechanism that would aid in the safe de-orbiting of the telescope by an unmanned spacecraft at the end of its operational lifespan. The mission also carried an IMAX camera and the crew documented the progress of the mission for an upcoming IMAX movie.

This version of the patch was the as-flown version. There was also a prototype version that was visible on crew suits during training for the mission and can be identified by the dotted stitching style around the solar panals of the HST. Thhis version has thicker, solid embroidery around the solar panels. 

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4" / 100mm
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STS-125 - 4" - Prototype Version - Unknown maker

STS-125, or HST-SM4 (Hubble Space Telescope Servicing Mission 4), was the fifth and final space shuttle servicing mission to the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Launch occurred on 11 May 2009 at 2:01 pm EDT. Landing occurred on 24 May at 11:39 am EDT, with the mission lasting a total of just under 13 days.
Space Shuttle Atlantis carried two new instruments to the Hubble Space Telescope, the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph and the Wide Field Camera 3. The mission also replaced a Fine Guidance Sensor, six gyroscopes, and two battery unit modules to allow the telescope to continue to function at least through 2014. The crew also installed new thermal blanket insulating panels to provide improved thermal protection, and a soft-capture mechanism that would aid in the safe de-orbiting of the telescope by an unmanned spacecraft at the end of its operational lifespan. The mission also carried an IMAX camera and the crew documented the progress of the mission for an upcoming IMAX movie.

This version of the patch was visible on crew suits during training for the mission and can be identified by the dotted stitching style around the solar panals of the HST. The version that was flown has thicker, solid embroidery around the solar panels. 

 KSC-08PD-2871

Size: 
4" / 100mm
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Astronaut Class of 2000 - Group 18

Seventeen men and women have been selected for the astronaut
candidate class of 2000, scheduled to arrive at NASA's Johnson
Space Center, Houston, TX, in August to begin a period of 
training and evaluation.
     This year's class consists of seven pilot and 10 mission
specialist candidates.  Of the 17 class members, 14 are male and
three are female. 

Dominic A. Antonelli (Lt., USN)
Michael R. Barratt M.D.
Robert L. Behnken (Capt., USAF)
Eric A. Boe (Maj., USAF)
Stephen G. Bowen (Lt. Cmdr., USN)
B. Alvin Drew (Maj., USAF)
Andrew J. Feustel, Ph.D.
Kevin A. Ford (Lt. Col., USAF)
Ronald J. Garan, Jr. (Maj., USAF)
Michael T. Good (Maj., USAF)
Douglas G. Hurley (Maj., USMC)
Timothy L. Kopra (Maj., USA)
K. Megan McArthur
Karen L. Nyberg, Ph.D.
Nicole P. Stott
Terry W. Virts, Jr. (Capt., USAF)
Barry E. Wilmore (Lt. Cmdr., USN

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