sellers

STS-121 - 4" - Cape Kennedy Medals

STS-121 was a 2006 NASA Space Shuttle mission to the International Space Station (ISS) flown by Space Shuttle Discovery. The main purposes of the mission were to test new safety and repair techniques introduced following the Columbia disaster of February 2003 as well as to deliver supplies, equipment and European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut Thomas Reiter from Germany to the ISS.

STS-121 was also designated the ISS Assembly Mission ULF 1.1. As the mission followed on from STS-114 in carrying out the recommendations made in response to the Columbia Accident Investigation Board report, it was considered a Return to Flight test mission. Its successful launch and landing led NASA to fully resume regular Space Shuttle launches in the construction of the ISS.

 

Size: 
4" / 100mm
Classification: 
Rating: 
0
No votes yet
Collector Value: 
0
No votes yet

STS-121 - 4" - A-B Emblem

STS-121 was a 2006 NASA Space Shuttle mission to the International Space Station (ISS) flown by Space Shuttle Discovery. The main purposes of the mission were to test new safety and repair techniques introduced following the Columbia disaster of February 2003 as well as to deliver supplies, equipment and European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut Thomas Reiter from Germany to the ISS.

STS-121 was also designated the ISS Assembly Mission ULF 1.1. As the mission followed on from STS-114 in carrying out the recommendations made in response to the Columbia Accident Investigation Board report, it was considered a Return to Flight test mission. Its successful launch and landing led NASA to fully resume regular Space Shuttle launches in the construction of the ISS.

The A-B Emblem version has a star that is fully embroidered and it has a cut edge. 

Size: 
4" / 100mm
Classification: 
Rating: 
0
No votes yet
Collector Value: 
0
No votes yet

STS-132 - 4" - Unknown maker

STS-132 (ISS assembly flight ULF4) was a NASA Space Shuttle mission, during which Space Shuttle Atlantis docked with the International Space Station on 16 May 2010. STS-132 was launched from the Kennedy Space Center on 14 May 2010. The primary payload was the Russian Rassvet Mini-Research Module, along with an Integrated Cargo Carrier-Vertical Light Deployable (ICC-VLD). Atlantis landed at the Kennedy Space Center on 26 May 2010.
STS-132 was initially scheduled to be the final flight of Atlantis, provided that the STS-335/STS-135 Launch On Need rescue mission was not flown. However, in February 2011, NASA declared that the final mission of Atlantis and of the Space Shuttle program, STS-135, would be flown regardless of the funding situation.

The STS-132 mission patch features Atlantis flying off into the sunset as the end of the Space Shuttle Program approaches. However the sun is also heralding the promise of a new day as it rises for the first time on a new ISS module, the MRM-1, which is also named Rassvet, the Russian word for dawn.

This version of the STS-132 patch lacks the gold border around the Atlantis orbiter. It also has a cut edge.

Size: 
4" / 100mm
Classification: 
Rating: 
0
No votes yet
Collector Value: 
0
No votes yet

STS-132 - 4" - A-B Emblem

STS-132 (ISS assembly flight ULF4) was a NASA Space Shuttle mission, during which Space Shuttle Atlantis docked with the International Space Station on 16 May 2010. STS-132 was launched from the Kennedy Space Center on 14 May 2010. The primary payload was the Russian Rassvet Mini-Research Module, along with an Integrated Cargo Carrier-Vertical Light Deployable (ICC-VLD). Atlantis landed at the Kennedy Space Center on 26 May 2010.
STS-132 was initially scheduled to be the final flight of Atlantis, provided that the STS-335/STS-135 Launch On Need rescue mission was not flown. However, in February 2011, NASA declared that the final mission of Atlantis and of the Space Shuttle program, STS-135, would be flown regardless of the funding situation.

The STS-132 mission patch features Atlantis flying off into the sunset as the end of the Space Shuttle Program approaches. However the sun is also heralding the promise of a new day as it rises for the first time on a new ISS module, the MRM-1, which is also named Rassvet, the Russian word for dawn.

Size: 
4" / 100mm
Classification: 
Rating: 
0
No votes yet
Collector Value: 
0
No votes yet

STS-121 - 4" - "Volkov" - Cape Kennedy Medals

STS-121 was a 2006 NASA Space Shuttle mission to the International Space Station (ISS) flown by Space Shuttle Discovery. The main purposes of the mission were to test new safety and repair techniques introduced following the Columbia disaster of February 2003 as well as to deliver supplies, equipment and European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut Thomas Reiter from Germany to the ISS.

STS-121 was also designated the ISS Assembly Mission ULF 1.1. As the mission followed on from STS-114 in carrying out the recommendations made in response to the Columbia Accident Investigation Board report, it was considered a Return to Flight test mission. Its successful launch and landing led NASA to fully resume regular Space Shuttle launches in the construction of the ISS.

There were several crew changes made along the way for STS-121. This version has Volkov instead of Reiter. Thomas Reiter's position was previously planned to be filled by Sergey Volkov (Russia) before the launch of STS-121 was postponed until July 2006.

Size: 
4" / 100mm
Classification: 
Rating: 
0
No votes yet
Collector Value: 
0
No votes yet

STS-121 - 4" - "Caldwell" - Randy Hunt

STS-121 was a 2006 NASA Space Shuttle mission to the International Space Station (ISS) flown by Space Shuttle Discovery. The main purposes of the mission were to test new safety and repair techniques introduced following the Columbia disaster of February 2003 as well as to deliver supplies, equipment and European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut Thomas Reiter from Germany to the ISS.

STS-121 was also designated the ISS Assembly Mission ULF 1.1. As the mission followed on from STS-114 in carrying out the recommendations made in response to the Columbia Accident Investigation Board report, it was considered a Return to Flight test mission. Its successful launch and landing led NASA to fully resume regular Space Shuttle launches in the construction of the ISS.

There were several crew changes made along the way for STS-121. Randy Hunt captured several of these variations:

This version has Caldwell instead of Reiter.

Size: 
4" / 100mm
Classification: 
Rating: 
0
No votes yet
Collector Value: 
0
No votes yet

STS-121 - 4" - "No Reiter" - Randy Hunt

STS-121 was a 2006 NASA Space Shuttle mission to the International Space Station (ISS) flown by Space Shuttle Discovery. The main purposes of the mission were to test new safety and repair techniques introduced following the Columbia disaster of February 2003 as well as to deliver supplies, equipment and European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut Thomas Reiter from Germany to the ISS.

STS-121 was also designated the ISS Assembly Mission ULF 1.1. As the mission followed on from STS-114 in carrying out the recommendations made in response to the Columbia Accident Investigation Board report, it was considered a Return to Flight test mission. Its successful launch and landing led NASA to fully resume regular Space Shuttle launches in the construction of the ISS.

There were several crew changes made along the way for STS-121. Randy Hunt captured several of these variations:

This version lacks Reiter. 

Size: 
4" / 100mm
Classification: 
Rating: 
0
No votes yet
Collector Value: 
0
No votes yet

STS-121 - 4" - Unknown maker

STS-121 was a 2006 NASA Space Shuttle mission to the International Space Station (ISS) flown by Space Shuttle Discovery. The main purposes of the mission were to test new safety and repair techniques introduced following the Columbia disaster of February 2003 as well as to deliver supplies, equipment and European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut Thomas Reiter from Germany to the ISS.

STS-121 was also designated the ISS Assembly Mission ULF 1.1. As the mission followed on from STS-114 in carrying out the recommendations made in response to the Columbia Accident Investigation Board report, it was considered a Return to Flight test mission. Its successful launch and landing led NASA to fully resume regular Space Shuttle launches in the construction of the ISS.

This version differs from the A-B Emblem version as it does not have a fully embroidered star or cut edge. It is similar to the Cape Kennedy Medals version however the embroidery of the yellow lanes leading to the sun are fully embroidered. 

Size: 
4" / 100mm
Classification: 
Rating: 
0
No votes yet
Collector Value: 
0
No votes yet

STS-112 - 4" - Eagle Crest Emblem

STS-112 (ISS assembly flight 9A) was an 11-day space shuttle mission to the International Space Station (ISS) flown by Space Shuttle Atlantis.[1] Space Shuttle Atlantis was launched on 7 October 2002 at 19:45 UTC from the Kennedy Space Center's launch pad 39B to deliver the 28,000 pound Starboard 1 (S1) truss segment to the Space Station.[2] Ending a 4.5-million-mile journey, Atlantis landed at 15:44 UTC on 18 October 2002 on runway 33 at the Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility.
STS-112 carried several science experiments to the space station including the Plant Generic Bioprocessing Apparatus (PGBA), Commercial Generic Bioprocessing Apparatus (CGBA), the Protein Crystal Growth Single-locker Thermal Enclosure System housing the Protein Crystallization Apparatus for Microgravity (PCG-STES-PCAM) and samples for the Zeolite Crystal Growth Furnace (ZCG) experiment.

The STS-112 emblem symbolizes the ninth assembly mission (9A) to the International Space Station (ISS), a flight which is designed to deliver the Starboard 1 (S1) truss segment. The 30,000 pound truss segment will be lifted to orbit in the payload bay of the Space Shuttle Atlantis and installed using the ISS robotic arm. Three space walks will then be carried out to complete connections between the truss and ISS. Future missions will extend the truss structure to a span of over 350 feet so that it can support the solar arrays and radiators which provide the electrical power and cooling for ISS. The STS-112 emblem depicts ISS from the viewpoint of a departing shuttle, with the installed S1 truss segment outlined in red. A gold trail represents a portion of the Shuttle rendezvous trajectory. Where the trajectory meets ISS, a nine-pointed star represents the combined on-orbit team of six shuttle and three ISS crew members who together will complete the S1 truss installation. The trajectory continues beyond the ISS, ending in a six-pointed star representing the Atlantis and the STS-112 crew.

Size: 
4" / 100mm
Classification: 
Rating: 
0
No votes yet
Collector Value: 
0
No votes yet

STS-112 - 4" - A-B Emblem

STS-112 (ISS assembly flight 9A) was an 11-day space shuttle mission to the International Space Station (ISS) flown by Space Shuttle Atlantis.[1] Space Shuttle Atlantis was launched on 7 October 2002 at 19:45 UTC from the Kennedy Space Center's launch pad 39B to deliver the 28,000 pound Starboard 1 (S1) truss segment to the Space Station.[2] Ending a 4.5-million-mile journey, Atlantis landed at 15:44 UTC on 18 October 2002 on runway 33 at the Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility.
STS-112 carried several science experiments to the space station including the Plant Generic Bioprocessing Apparatus (PGBA), Commercial Generic Bioprocessing Apparatus (CGBA), the Protein Crystal Growth Single-locker Thermal Enclosure System housing the Protein Crystallization Apparatus for Microgravity (PCG-STES-PCAM) and samples for the Zeolite Crystal Growth Furnace (ZCG) experiment.

The STS-112 emblem symbolizes the ninth assembly mission (9A) to the International Space Station (ISS), a flight which is designed to deliver the Starboard 1 (S1) truss segment. The 30,000 pound truss segment will be lifted to orbit in the payload bay of the Space Shuttle Atlantis and installed using the ISS robotic arm. Three space walks will then be carried out to complete connections between the truss and ISS. Future missions will extend the truss structure to a span of over 350 feet so that it can support the solar arrays and radiators which provide the electrical power and cooling for ISS. The STS-112 emblem depicts ISS from the viewpoint of a departing shuttle, with the installed S1 truss segment outlined in red. A gold trail represents a portion of the Shuttle rendezvous trajectory. Where the trajectory meets ISS, a nine-pointed star represents the combined on-orbit team of six shuttle and three ISS crew members who together will complete the S1 truss installation. The trajectory continues beyond the ISS, ending in a six-pointed star representing the Atlantis and the STS-112 crew.

Size: 
4" / 100mm
Classification: 
Rating: 
0
No votes yet
Collector Value: 
0
No votes yet

ASTROLAB original

This ASTROLAB patch is one of the original patches designed by German space artist Detlev van Ravenswaay (bottom image left - his internet site: www.vanravenswaay.com/explorer/index.html) which he kindly gave to me. Unfortunately he was not able to tell me who did manufactured it.

"Between 4 July and 22 December 2006, Thomas Reiter took part in the Astrolab Mission - ESA's first long-duration mission to the International Space Station. Following the launch with Space Shuttle Discovery on flight STS-121, Reiter spent 166 days on board ISS as Flight Engineer 2 for ISS Expedition crews 13 and 14. During his stay, as well as his duties as Flight Engineer, he conducted 19 experiments on behalf of a number of European institutions and research centres, focussing on areas such as human physiology and psychology, microbiology, plasma physics and radiation dosimetry as well as technology demonstrations. On 3 August 2006, together with NASA astronaut Jeff Williams, he participated in a 5 hour 54 minute spacewalk to install hardware on the ISS exterior to support future assembly work. After 171 days in space, Reiter returned to Earth with STS-116 [Discovery], landing at Kennedy Space Center, Florida, on 22 December 2006." (extracted from www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Human_Spaceflight/Astrolab).

Classification: 
Rating: 
0
No votes yet
Collector Value: 
0
No votes yet
Subscribe to RSS - sellers