Error message

User warning: The following module is missing from the file system: imagcache_actions. For information about how to fix this, see the documentation page. in _drupal_trigger_error_with_delayed_logging() (line 1143 of /home/roland/public_html/patches/includes/bootstrap.inc).

lucid

added via import

STS-76 - 4" - Space Coast International

STS-76 was NASA's 76th Space Shuttle mission, and the 16th mission for Atlantis. STS-76 launched on 22 March 1996 at 3:13 am EST (UTC −5) from Kennedy Space Center launch pad 39B. STS-76 lasted over 9 days, traveled about 3,800,000 miles (6,100,000 km) while orbiting Earth an estimated 145 times, and landing at 5:28 am PST (UTC −8) on 31 March 1996 at Edwards Air Force Base runway 22.
The flight was the third Shuttle mission to dock with the Russian Space Station Mir, as part of the Shuttle-Mir Program, carrying astronaut Shanon Lucid to the orbital laboratory to replace NASA astronaut Norm Thagard. STS-76 also carried a SPACEHAB single module along with Lucid, and on flight day 6 Linda Godwin and Michael R. Clifford performed the first U.S. spacewalk around two docked spacecraft.

This patch was produced by Space Coast International and was carried on board STS-76 in the Official Flight Kit. It has some minor differences from the official A-B Emblem version, primarily in the Mir detail and extra set of solar panels. 

Size: 
4" / 100mm
Classification: 
Rating: 
0
No votes yet
Collector Value: 
0
No votes yet

STS-76 - 4" - A-B Emblem Prototype

STS-76 was NASA's 76th Space Shuttle mission, and the 16th mission for Atlantis. STS-76 launched on 22 March 1996 at 3:13 am EST (UTC −5) from Kennedy Space Center launch pad 39B. STS-76 lasted over 9 days, traveled about 3,800,000 miles (6,100,000 km) while orbiting Earth an estimated 145 times, and landing at 5:28 am PST (UTC −8) on 31 March 1996 at Edwards Air Force Base runway 22.
The flight was the third Shuttle mission to dock with the Russian Space Station Mir, as part of the Shuttle-Mir Program, carrying astronaut Shanon Lucid to the orbital laboratory to replace NASA astronaut Norm Thagard. STS-76 also carried a SPACEHAB single module along with Lucid, and on flight day 6 Linda Godwin and Michael R. Clifford performed the first U.S. spacewalk around two docked spacecraft.

This is the A-B Emblem prototype version of the STS-76 patch. It has white thread instead of black for the Mir details and an extra set of solar arrays. The stars have a black shadow, but do not appear behind the yellow contrails like in the souvenir version. 

Size: 
4" / 100mm
Classification: 
Rating: 
0
No votes yet
Collector Value: 
0
No votes yet

STS-51G - A-B Emblem - Modern

STS-51-G was the eighteenth flight of NASA's Space Shuttle program, and the fifth flight of Space Shuttle Discovery. The seven-day mission launched from Kennedy Space Center, Florida, on 17 June 1985, and landed at Edwards Air Force Base, California, on 24 June. Sultan Salman Al Saud of Saudi Arabia was on board as a payload specialist; Al Saud became the first Arab, the first Muslim, and the first member of a royal family to fly into space.[1] It was also the first Space Shuttle mission which flew without at least one astronaut from the pre-Shuttle era among its crew.

The A-B Emblem patch is a single piece and uses modern embroidery techniques. 

Size: 
4" / 100mm
Project: 
Classification: 
Rating: 
0
No votes yet
Collector Value: 
0
No votes yet

STS-79 - 4" - Eagle Crest Emblem

STS-79 was the 17th flight of Space Shuttle Atlantis, and the 79th mission of the Space Shuttle program. The flight saw Atlantis dock with the Russian space station Mir to deliver equipment, supplies and relief personnel. A variety of scientific experiments were also conducted aboard Atlantis by her crew. It was the first shuttle mission to rendezvous with a fully assembled Mir, and the fourth rendezvous of a shuttle to the space station

STS-79 also marked the second flight of the SPACEHAB module in support of a Shuttle-Mir docking and the first flight of the SPACEHAB Double Module configuration. The forward portion of the double module housed experiments conducted by the crew before, during and after Atlantis was docked to the Russian space station. The aft portion of the double module housed the logistics equipment to be transferred to Mir, which included food, clothing, experiments, supplies, and spare equipment. The mass of the module was 4,774 kilograms (10,520 lb).

Size: 
4" / 100mm
Classification: 
Rating: 
0
No votes yet
Collector Value: 
0
No votes yet

STS-79 - 4" - Unknown maker

STS-79 was the 17th flight of Space Shuttle Atlantis, and the 79th mission of the Space Shuttle program. The flight saw Atlantis dock with the Russian space station Mir to deliver equipment, supplies and relief personnel. A variety of scientific experiments were also conducted aboard Atlantis by her crew. It was the first shuttle mission to rendezvous with a fully assembled Mir, and the fourth rendezvous of a shuttle to the space station

STS-79 also marked the second flight of the SPACEHAB module in support of a Shuttle-Mir docking and the first flight of the SPACEHAB Double Module configuration. The forward portion of the double module housed experiments conducted by the crew before, during and after Atlantis was docked to the Russian space station. The aft portion of the double module housed the logistics equipment to be transferred to Mir, which included food, clothing, experiments, supplies, and spare equipment. The mass of the module was 4,774 kilograms (10,520 lb).

This version of the STS-78 patch has a cut edge.

Size: 
4" / 100mm
Classification: 
Rating: 
0
No votes yet
Collector Value: 
0
No votes yet

STS-79 - 4" - A-B Emblem (Modern)

STS-79 was the 17th flight of Space Shuttle Atlantis, and the 79th mission of the Space Shuttle program. The flight saw Atlantis dock with the Russian space station Mir to deliver equipment, supplies and relief personnel. A variety of scientific experiments were also conducted aboard Atlantis by her crew. It was the first shuttle mission to rendezvous with a fully assembled Mir, and the fourth rendezvous of a shuttle to the space station

STS-79 also marked the second flight of the SPACEHAB module in support of a Shuttle-Mir docking and the first flight of the SPACEHAB Double Module configuration. The forward portion of the double module housed experiments conducted by the crew before, during and after Atlantis was docked to the Russian space station. The aft portion of the double module housed the logistics equipment to be transferred to Mir, which included food, clothing, experiments, supplies, and spare equipment. The mass of the module was 4,774 kilograms (10,520 lb).

Size: 
4" / 100mm
Classification: 
Rating: 
0
No votes yet
Collector Value: 
0
No votes yet

STS-79 - 4" - A-B Emblem

STS-79 was the 17th flight of Space Shuttle Atlantis, and the 79th mission of the Space Shuttle program. The flight saw Atlantis dock with the Russian space station Mir to deliver equipment, supplies and relief personnel. A variety of scientific experiments were also conducted aboard Atlantis by her crew. It was the first shuttle mission to rendezvous with a fully assembled Mir, and the fourth rendezvous of a shuttle to the space station

STS-79 also marked the second flight of the SPACEHAB module in support of a Shuttle-Mir docking and the first flight of the SPACEHAB Double Module configuration. The forward portion of the double module housed experiments conducted by the crew before, during and after Atlantis was docked to the Russian space station. The aft portion of the double module housed the logistics equipment to be transferred to Mir, which included food, clothing, experiments, supplies, and spare equipment. The mass of the module was 4,774 kilograms (10,520 lb).

Size: 
4" / 100mm
Classification: 
Rating: 
0
No votes yet
Collector Value: 
0
No votes yet

STS-76/EO-21 - 4" - Unknown maker

STS-76 was NASA's 76th Space Shuttle mission, and the 16th mission for Atlantis. STS-76 launched on 22 March 1996 at 3:13 am EST (UTC −5) from Kennedy Space Center launch pad 39B. STS-76 lasted over 9 days, traveled about 3,800,000 miles (6,100,000 km) while orbiting Earth an estimated 145 times, and landing at 5:28 am PST (UTC −8) on 31 March 1996 at Edwards Air Force Base runway 22.
The flight was the third Shuttle mission to dock with the Russian Space Station Mir, as part of the Shuttle-Mir Program, carrying astronaut Shanon Lucid to the orbital laboratory to replace NASA astronaut Norm Thagard. STS-76 also carried a SPACEHAB single module along with Lucid, and on flight day 6 Linda Godwin and Michael R. Clifford performed the first U.S. spacewalk around two docked spacecraft.

Mir EO-21 was a long-duration mission aboard the Russian Space station Mir, which occurred between February and September 1996. The crew consisted of two Russian cosmonauts, Commander Yuri Onufrienko and Yury Usachov, as well as American astronaut Shannon Lucid. Lucid arrived at the station about a month into the expedition, and left about a week following its conclusion; NASA refers to her mission as NASA-2. She was the second American to have a long-duration stay aboard Mir, the first being Norman Thagard, as a crew member of Mir EO-18; he stayed on the station for 111 days. Some sources refer to her mission as Mir NASA-1, claiming that she was the first American to have a long-duration stay aboard Mir.

Size: 
4" / 100mm
Classification: 
Rating: 
0
No votes yet
Collector Value: 
0
No votes yet

STS-76 - 4" - A-B Emblem

STS-76 was NASA's 76th Space Shuttle mission, and the 16th mission for Atlantis. STS-76 launched on 22 March 1996 at 3:13 am EST (UTC −5) from Kennedy Space Center launch pad 39B. STS-76 lasted over 9 days, traveled about 3,800,000 miles (6,100,000 km) while orbiting Earth an estimated 145 times, and landing at 5:28 am PST (UTC −8) on 31 March 1996 at Edwards Air Force Base runway 22.
The flight was the third Shuttle mission to dock with the Russian Space Station Mir, as part of the Shuttle-Mir Program, carrying astronaut Shanon Lucid to the orbital laboratory to replace NASA astronaut Norm Thagard. STS-76 also carried a SPACEHAB single module along with Lucid, and on flight day 6 Linda Godwin and Michael R. Clifford performed the first U.S. spacewalk around two docked spacecraft.

Size: 
4" / 100mm
Classification: 
Rating: 
0
No votes yet
Collector Value: 
0
No votes yet

STS-58 - 4" - Unknown maker

STS-58 was a mission flown by Space Shuttle Columbia launched from Kennedy Space Center, Florida, on 18 October 1993. It was also the last time Columbia would land at Edwards Air Force Base. STS-58 was a 1993 shuttle mission dedicated to life sciences research. Columbia’s crew performed a series of experiments to gain knowledge on how the human body adapts to the weightless environment of space. Experiments focused on cardiovascular, regulatory, neurovestibular and musculoskeletal systems of the body. The experiments performed on Columbia’s crew and on laboratory animals (48 rats held in 24 cages), along with data collected on the SLS-1 mission in June 1991, will provide the most detailed and interrelated physiological measurements acquired in the space environment since the Skylab program in 1973 and 1974.

Unlike the A-B emblem version of the STS-58 patch, this version properly includes the cadeceus and medical symbols as in the original artwork.

 

Size: 
4" / 100mm
Project: 
Classification: 
Rating: 
0
No votes yet
Collector Value: 
0
No votes yet

STS-58 - 4" - A-B Emblem

STS-58 was a mission flown by Space Shuttle Columbia launched from Kennedy Space Center, Florida, on 18 October 1993. It was also the last time Columbia would land at Edwards Air Force Base. STS-58 was a 1993 shuttle mission dedicated to life sciences research. Columbia’s crew performed a series of experiments to gain knowledge on how the human body adapts to the weightless environment of space. Experiments focused on cardiovascular, regulatory, neurovestibular and musculoskeletal systems of the body. The experiments performed on Columbia’s crew and on laboratory animals (48 rats held in 24 cages), along with data collected on the SLS-1 mission in June 1991, will provide the most detailed and interrelated physiological measurements acquired in the space environment since the Skylab program in 1973 and 1974.

Curiously, this patch lacks the caduceus and medical symbols as in the original artwork.

Size: 
4" / 100mm
Project: 
Classification: 
Rating: 
0
No votes yet
Collector Value: 
0
No votes yet

STS-51G - 3" - "Baudy"

Unknown manufacturer, modern issue. Noted only because it spells crew member "Baudry" as "Baudy".

Size: 
3" / 76mm
Project: 
Classification: 
Rating: 
0
No votes yet
Collector Value: 
0
No votes yet

STS-43 - 4" - Unknown maker

STS-43, the ninth mission for Space Shuttle Atlantis, was a nine-day mission whose primary goal was launching the fourth Tracking and Data Relay Satellite, TDRS-E. The flight also tested an advanced heatpipe radiator for potential use on the then-future space station and conducted a variety of medical and materials science investigations.

The primary payload, Tracking and Data Relay Satellite-5 (TDRS-5 or TDRS-E), attached to an Inertial Upper Stage (IUS), was deployed about six hours into flight, and the IUS propelled the satellite into geosynchronous orbit. TDRS-5 became the fourth member of the orbiting TDRS cluster. Secondary payloads were Space Station Heat Pipe Advanced Radiator Element II (SHARE II); Shuttle Solar Backscatter Ultra-Violet (SSBUV) instrument; Tank Pressure Control Equipment (TPCE) and Optical Communications Through Windows (OCTW). Other experiments included Auroral Photography Experiment (APE-B) Protein Crystal Growth Ill (PCG Ill); Bioserve / Instrumentation Technology Associates Materials Dispersion Apparatus (BIMDA); Investigations Into Polymer Membrane Processing (IPMP); Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS); Solid Surface Combustion Experiment (SSCE); Ultraviolet Plume imager (UVPI); and the Air Force Maui Optical Site (AMOS) experiment.

This version has modern embroidery.

Size: 
4" / 100mm
Project: 
Classification: 
Rating: 
0
No votes yet
Collector Value: 
0
No votes yet

STS-43 - 4" - A-B Emblem

STS-43, the ninth mission for Space Shuttle Atlantis, was a nine-day mission whose primary goal was launching the fourth Tracking and Data Relay Satellite, TDRS-E. The flight also tested an advanced heatpipe radiator for potential use on the then-future space station and conducted a variety of medical and materials science investigations.

The primary payload, Tracking and Data Relay Satellite-5 (TDRS-5 or TDRS-E), attached to an Inertial Upper Stage (IUS), was deployed about six hours into flight, and the IUS propelled the satellite into geosynchronous orbit. TDRS-5 became the fourth member of the orbiting TDRS cluster. Secondary payloads were Space Station Heat Pipe Advanced Radiator Element II (SHARE II); Shuttle Solar Backscatter Ultra-Violet (SSBUV) instrument; Tank Pressure Control Equipment (TPCE) and Optical Communications Through Windows (OCTW). Other experiments included Auroral Photography Experiment (APE-B) Protein Crystal Growth Ill (PCG Ill); Bioserve / Instrumentation Technology Associates Materials Dispersion Apparatus (BIMDA); Investigations Into Polymer Membrane Processing (IPMP); Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS); Solid Surface Combustion Experiment (SSCE); Ultraviolet Plume imager (UVPI); and the Air Force Maui Optical Site (AMOS) experiment.

Size: 
4" / 100mm
Project: 
Classification: 
Rating: 
0
No votes yet
Collector Value: 
0
No votes yet

STS-51D - Randy Hunt Replica

This mission's purpose was to deploy a Syncom/Leasat satellite into a geosynchronous orbit and retrieve and return the Long Duration Exposure Facility, whose orbit was decaying slowly after doing its mission. The crew would've consisted of 5 NASA astronauts and 2 Payload Specialists: Commander Dan Brandenstein, Pilot John Creighton, Mission Specialists Steve Nagel, John Fabian, and Shannon Lucid, and Payload Specialists Greg Jarvis and Charlie Walker. Scheduled for launch in either March or April of 1985, the orbiter that would've flown STS-51D was Discovery. There was some bad news, which was not about IUS problems this time: the STS-51E mission was cancelled and the crews changed missions; Brandenstein's crew moved to 51G and Bobko 's crew moved to the newly remanifested STS-51D flight. Charlie Walker chose to stay on this mission, because of the experiments he had to perform. So, an original member of STS-51E, Patrick Baudry, moved to STS-51G and Charlie Walker retained his spot as Payload Specialist 1.

This is Randy Hunt's replica version of the patch. The rounded tab corners and distinct color banding on the back are easy tells. One piece construction.

Size: 
4" / 100mm
Project: 
Classification: 
Rating: 
0
No votes yet
Collector Value: 
0
No votes yet

STS-34 - 3" - Unknown maker

STS-34 was a NASA Space Shuttle mission using the Atlantis orbiter. It was the 31st shuttle mission overall, and the fifth flight for Atlantis. STS-34 launched from Kennedy Space Center, Florida, on 18 October 1989, and landed at Edwards Air Force Base, California, on 23 October. During the mission, the Jupiter-bound Galileo probe was deployed into space.

This 3" version has "USA" on the wing.

Size: 
3" / 76mm
Project: 
Classification: 
Rating: 
0
No votes yet
Collector Value: 
0
No votes yet

STS-34 - Unknown maker

 

STS-34 was a NASA Space Shuttle mission using the Atlantis orbiter. It was the 31st shuttle mission overall, and the fifth flight for Atlantis. STS-34 launched from Kennedy Space Center, Florida, on 18 October 1989, and landed at Edwards Air Force Base, California, on 23 October. During the mission, the Jupiter-bound Galileo probe was deployed into space.

The real tell on this particular patch is the size of the "USA" on the wing. This has a very large bold "USA".

Size: 
4" / 100mm
Project: 
Classification: 
Rating: 
0
No votes yet
Collector Value: 
0
No votes yet

STS-34 - 3" - Unknown maker

 

STS-34 was a NASA Space Shuttle mission using the Atlantis orbiter. It was the 31st shuttle mission overall, and the fifth flight for Atlantis. STS-34 launched from Kennedy Space Center, Florida, on 18 October 1989, and landed at Edwards Air Force Base, California, on 23 October. During the mission, the Jupiter-bound Galileo probe was deployed into space.

The real tell on this particular patch has no "USA" on the wing and a twill background.

Size: 
3" / 76mm
Project: 
Classification: 
Rating: 
0
No votes yet
Collector Value: 
0
No votes yet

STS-34 - Swissartex

 

STS-34 was a NASA Space Shuttle mission using the Atlantis orbiter. It was the 31st shuttle mission overall, and the fifth flight for Atlantis. STS-34 launched from Kennedy Space Center, Florida, on 18 October 1989, and landed at Edwards Air Force Base, California, on 23 October. During the mission, the Jupiter-bound Galileo probe was deployed into space.

The real tell on this particular patch is the size of the "USA" on the wing. Swissartex version has a medium sized "USA" compared to the A-B Emblem version.

Size: 
4" / 100mm
Project: 
Classification: 
Rating: 
0
No votes yet
Collector Value: 
0
No votes yet

STS-34 - A-B Emblem

STS-34 was a NASA Space Shuttle mission using the Atlantis orbiter. It was the 31st shuttle mission overall, and the fifth flight for Atlantis. STS-34 launched from Kennedy Space Center, Florida, on 18 October 1989, and landed at Edwards Air Force Base, California, on 23 October. During the mission, the Jupiter-bound Galileo probe was deployed into space.

The real tell on this particular patch is the size of the "USA" on the wing. A-B Emblem has a small "USA".

Size: 
4" / 100mm
Project: 
Classification: 
Rating: 
0
No votes yet
Collector Value: 
0
No votes yet

STS-51G - Unknown 3"

STS-51-G was the eighteenth flight of NASA's Space Shuttle program, and the fifth flight of Space Shuttle Discovery. The seven-day mission launched from Kennedy Space Center, Florida, on 17 June 1985, and landed at Edwards Air Force Base, California, on 24 June. Sultan Salman Al Saud of Saudi Arabia was on board as a payload specialist; Al Saud became the first Arab, the first Muslim, and the first member of a royal family to fly into space.[1] It was also the first Space Shuttle mission which flew without at least one astronaut from the pre-Shuttle era among its crew.

This is a 3-3.5" version of the STS-51G patch. Twill backing with white thread used for the contrails instead of light blue.

Size: 
3.5" / 90mm
Project: 
Classification: 
Rating: 
0
No votes yet
Collector Value: 
0
No votes yet

STS-51G - Unknown maker

STS-51-G was the eighteenth flight of NASA's Space Shuttle program, and the fifth flight of Space Shuttle Discovery. The seven-day mission launched from Kennedy Space Center, Florida, on 17 June 1985, and landed at Edwards Air Force Base, California, on 24 June. Sultan Salman Al Saud of Saudi Arabia was on board as a payload specialist; Al Saud became the first Arab, the first Muslim, and the first member of a royal family to fly into space.[1] It was also the first Space Shuttle mission which flew without at least one astronaut from the pre-Shuttle era among its crew.

At first glance it appears to be a A-B Emblem version, however there are some slight differences, such as the line of stitching under each contrail. The wings of the Wright Flyer are a little more narrow.

Project: 
Classification: 
Rating: 
0
No votes yet
Collector Value: 
0
No votes yet

STS-51G - Unknown maker

 

STS-51-G was the eighteenth flight of NASA's Space Shuttle program, and the fifth flight of Space Shuttle Discovery. The seven-day mission launched from Kennedy Space Center, Florida, on 17 June 1985, and landed at Edwards Air Force Base, California, on 24 June. Sultan Salman Al Saud of Saudi Arabia was on board as a payload specialist; Al Saud became the first Arab, the first Muslim, and the first member of a royal family to fly into space.[1] It was also the first Space Shuttle mission which flew without at least one astronaut from the pre-Shuttle era among its crew.

A modern reproduction patch, single piece, vacuum sealed.
Size: 
4" / 100mm
Project: 
Classification: 
Rating: 
0
No votes yet
Collector Value: 
0
No votes yet

STS-51G - Swissartex

 

STS-51-G was the eighteenth flight of NASA's Space Shuttle program, and the fifth flight of Space Shuttle Discovery. The seven-day mission launched from Kennedy Space Center, Florida, on 17 June 1985, and landed at Edwards Air Force Base, California, on 24 June. Sultan Salman Al Saud of Saudi Arabia was on board as a payload specialist; Al Saud became the first Arab, the first Muslim, and the first member of a royal family to fly into space.[1] It was also the first Space Shuttle mission which flew without at least one astronaut from the pre-Shuttle era among its crew.

The Swissartex is a single-piece patch identified by the rounded-edge tab and stitching in the Wright Flyer trail.
 
There are two versions of this STS-51G patch manufactured by Swissartex Emblem Inc. The first has a waxy matt plastic coated backing, & the other has a shiny vacuum sealed backing. The modern version of this patch was manufactured by Eagle Crest Emblem Inc. in Taiwan.
Project: 
Classification: 
Rating: 
0
No votes yet
Collector Value: 
0
No votes yet

STS-51G - A-B Emblem

STS-51-G was the eighteenth flight of NASA's Space Shuttle program, and the fifth flight of Space Shuttle Discovery. The seven-day mission launched from Kennedy Space Center, Florida, on 17 June 1985, and landed at Edwards Air Force Base, California, on 24 June. Sultan Salman Al Saud of Saudi Arabia was on board as a payload specialist; Al Saud became the first Arab, the first Muslim, and the first member of a royal family to fly into space.[1] It was also the first Space Shuttle mission which flew without at least one astronaut from the pre-Shuttle era among its crew.

The A-B Emblem patch has a sew-on tab. 

Size: 
4" / 100mm
Project: 
Classification: 
Rating: 
0
No votes yet
Collector Value: 
0
No votes yet

STS-51D Cancelled Mission - 3"

This mission's purpose was to deploy a Syncom/Leasat satellite into a geosynchronous orbit and retrieve and return the Long Duration Exposure Facility, whose orbit was decaying slowly after doing its mission. The crew would've consisted of 5 NASA astronauts and 2 Payload Specialists: Commander Dan Brandenstein, Pilot John Creighton, Mission Specialists Steve Nagel, John Fabian, and Shannon Lucid, and Payload Specialists Greg Jarvis and Charlie Walker. Scheduled for launch in either March or April of 1985, the orbiter that would've flown STS-51D was Discovery. There was some bad news, which was not about IUS problems this time: the STS-51E mission was cancelled and the crews changed missions; Brandenstein's crew moved to 51G and Bobko 's crew moved to the newly remanifested STS-51D flight. Charlie Walker chose to stay on this mission, because of the experiments he had to perform. So, an original member of STS-51E, Patrick Baudry, moved to STS-51G and Charlie Walker retained his spot as Payload Specialist 1.
3" A-B Emblem version of the highly-sought patch.

Project: 
Classification: 
Rating: 
0
No votes yet
Collector Value: 
0
No votes yet

STS-51D - Reshuffled crew

This mission's purpose was to deploy a Syncom/Leasat satellite into a geosynchronous orbit and retrieve and return the Long Duration Exposure Facility, whose orbit was decaying slowly after doing its mission. The crew would've consisted of 5 NASA astronauts and 2 Payload Specialists: Commander Dan Brandenstein, Pilot John Creighton, Mission Specialists Steve Nagel, John Fabian, and Shannon Lucid, and Payload Specialists Greg Jarvis and Charlie Walker. Scheduled for launch in either March or April of 1985, the orbiter that would've flown STS-51D was Discovery. There was some bad news, which was not about IUS problems this time: the STS-51E mission was cancelled and the crews changed missions; Brandenstein's crew moved to 51G and Bobko 's crew moved to the newly remanifested STS-51D flight. Charlie Walker chose to stay on this mission, because of the experiments he had to perform. So, an original member of STS-51E, Patrick Baudry, moved to STS-51G and Charlie Walker retained his spot as Payload Specialist 1.

Size: 
4" / 100mm
Project: 
Classification: 
Rating: 
0
No votes yet
Collector Value: 
0
No votes yet
Subscribe to RSS - lucid