sts-51b

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Spacelab 3 - STS-51B

STS-51B was the second flight of the European Space Agency's Spacelab, and the first with the Spacelab module in a fully operational configuration. Spacelab's capabilities for multi-disciplinary research in microgravity were successfully demonstrated. The gravity gradient attitude of the orbiter proved quite stable, allowing the delicate experiments in materials processing and fluid mechanics to proceed normally. The crew operated around the clock in two 12-hour shifts. Two squirrel monkeys and 24 rats were flown in special cages,[2] the second time American astronauts flew live non-human mammals aboard the shuttle. The crew members in orbit were supported 24 hours a day by a temporary Payload Operations Control Center, located at the Johnson Space Center.

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STS-51G - Unknown maker

STS-51-G was the eighteenth flight of NASA's Space Shuttle program, and the fifth flight of Space Shuttle Discovery. The seven-day mission launched from Kennedy Space Center, Florida, on 17 June 1985, and landed at Edwards Air Force Base, California, on 24 June. Sultan Salman Al Saud of Saudi Arabia was on board as a payload specialist; Al Saud became the first Arab, the first Muslim, and the first member of a royal family to fly into space.[1] It was also the first Space Shuttle mission which flew without at least one astronaut from the pre-Shuttle era among its crew.

At first glance it appears to be a A-B Emblem version, however there are some slight differences, such as the line of stitching under each contrail. The wings of the Wright Flyer are a little more narrow.

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STS-51B - Drop Dynamics Module - DDM

Positioning techniques using the effects of acoustic-radiation pressure were used during the Spacelab 3 flight to carry out classical fluid dynamics experiments on liquid drops freely suspended in microgravity. Quantitative results dealing with the equilibrium shapes of acoustically rotated drops, with the response to the radiation pressure forces, and finally with the experimental measurement of surface tension have been obtained.

In June of 1983, Dr. Wang was selected by NASA to train as an astronaut-scientist for Spacelab-3, a research facility flown in the cargo bay of the space shuttle. In 1985, Dr. Wang flew aboard the Challenger as part of a seven member crew on the successful STS-51B mission (April 29 - May 5). During the flight, Dr. Wang studied the dynamic behavior of rotating spheroids in zero gravity in an experimental facility which he designed called the Drop Dynamics Module (DDM).

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STS-51B - Unknown maker

STS 51-B was the seventeenth flight of NASA's Space Shuttle program, and the seventh flight of Space Shuttle Challenger. The launch of Challenger on 29 April 1985 was delayed by 2 minutes and 18 seconds, due to a launch processing failure. Challenger was initially rolled out to the pad to launch on the STS-51-E mission. The shuttle was rolled back when a timing issue emerged with the TDRS-B satellite. When STS-51-E was canceled, Challenger was remanifested with the STS-51-B payloads. The shuttle landed successfully on 6 May 1985, after a week-long mission.

This patch is virtually identical to the A-B Emblem version, so it could possibly be a modern version from them using newer embroidery style.

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STS-51B - Unknown maker

STS 51-B was the seventeenth flight of NASA's Space Shuttle program, and the seventh flight of Space Shuttle Challenger. The launch of Challenger on 29 April 1985 was delayed by 2 minutes and 18 seconds, due to a launch processing failure. Challenger was initially rolled out to the pad to launch on the STS-51-E mission. The shuttle was rolled back when a timing issue emerged with the TDRS-B satellite. When STS-51-E was canceled, Challenger was remanifested with the STS-51-B payloads. The shuttle landed successfully on 6 May 1985, after a week-long mission.

This version of the patch has squared-off corners on the tab, single piece construction and modern embroidery. It also lacks a yellow border on the outer edge.

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4" / 100mm
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STS-51B - Swissartex

STS 51-B was the seventeenth flight of NASA's Space Shuttle program, and the seventh flight of Space Shuttle Challenger. The launch of Challenger on 29 April 1985 was delayed by 2 minutes and 18 seconds, due to a launch processing failure. Challenger was initially rolled out to the pad to launch on the STS-51-E mission. The shuttle was rolled back when a timing issue emerged with the TDRS-B satellite. When STS-51-E was canceled, Challenger was remanifested with the STS-51-B payloads. The shuttle landed successfully on 6 May 1985, after a week-long mission.

The Swissartex version of this patch has a radial border area stitching and  is a single piece construction.

There are two versions of this STS-51B patch manufactured by Swissartex Emblem Inc. One with a waxy matt plastic coated backing, & the other with a shiny vacuum sealed backing.

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4" / 100mm
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STS-51B - A-B Emblem

STS 51-B was the seventeenth flight of NASA's Space Shuttle program, and the seventh flight of Space Shuttle Challenger. The launch of Challenger on 29 April 1985 was delayed by 2 minutes and 18 seconds, due to a launch processing failure. Challenger was initially rolled out to the pad to launch on the STS-51-E mission. The shuttle was rolled back when a timing issue emerged with the TDRS-B satellite. When STS-51-E was canceled, Challenger was remanifested with the STS-51-B payloads. The shuttle landed successfully on 6 May 1985, after a week-long mission.

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4" / 100mm
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Spacelab 3 - STS-51B - Modern Reproduction

STS-51B was the second flight of the European Space Agency's Spacelab, and the first with the Spacelab module in a fully operational configuration. Spacelab's capabilities for multi-disciplinary research in microgravity were successfully demonstrated. The gravity gradient attitude of the orbiter proved quite stable, allowing the delicate experiments in materials processing and fluid mechanics to proceed normally. The crew operated around the clock in two 12-hour shifts. Two squirrel monkeys and 24 rats were flown in special cages,[2] the second time American astronauts flew live non-human mammals aboard the shuttle. The crew members in orbit were supported 24 hours a day by a temporary Payload Operations Control Center, located at the Johnson Space Center.

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Spacelab 3 - Live Cargo

STS-51-B was the second flight of the European Space Agency's Spacelab, and the first with the Spacelab module in a fully operational configuration. Spacelab's capabilities for multi-disciplinary research in microgravity were successfully demonstrated. The gravity gradient attitude of the orbiter proved quite stable, allowing the delicate experiments in materials processing and fluid mechanics to proceed normally. The crew operated around the clock in two 12-hour shifts. Two squirrel monkeys and 24 rats were flown in special cages,[2] the second time American astronauts flew live non-human mammals aboard the shuttle. The crew members in orbit were supported 24 hours a day by a temporary Payload Operations Control Center, located at the Johnson Space Center.

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Global Low Orbiting Message Relay Satellite (GLOMR)

GLOMR was a DARPA mission designed to demonstrate the ability to read out,
store, and forward data from remote ground-based sensors. The satellite
was first scheduled for deployment from STS-51B, but a battery problem
forced a return to Earth for repair. Reflown and deployed from STS-61A,
the vehicle finally re-entered after 14 months. The total price was less
than 1 million dollars.

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