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STS-35 - 4" A-B Emblem revised

The original STS-35 artwork differed significantly from the A-B Emblem STS-35" souvenir patch. A number of close reproductions by Cape Kennedy Medals and others have come close, but not matching the original prototype. In 2016, A-B Emblem, when stock of the older STS-35 patch ran out, produced a new version on their newer machines that more faithfully reflects the original artwork and prototype. This is the version currently on sale at their web site (as of September 2016). 

 

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4" / 100mm
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STS-62A - 4" - Concept

STS-62-A was a planned Space Shuttle mission to deliver a reconnaissance payload (Teal Ruby) into polar orbit. It was expected to use Discovery. It would have been the first manned launch from Vandenberg Air Force Base, California. The mission designation, 62-A, meant: 6=fiscal year 1986, 2=Vandenberg (1=Kennedy Space Center), and A=first flight in that fiscal year.

The destruction of Challenger and subsequent halt of the Space Shuttle Program led to the cancellation of the mission.

This is one of a set of three patches created based on the concept artwork for the missions. They may be unauthroized reproductions.

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4" / 100mm
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STS-62A - 4" - Concept

STS-62-A was a planned Space Shuttle mission to deliver a reconnaissance payload (Teal Ruby) into polar orbit. It was expected to use Discovery. It would have been the first manned launch from Vandenberg Air Force Base, California. The mission designation, 62-A, meant: 6=fiscal year 1986, 2=Vandenberg (1=Kennedy Space Center), and A=first flight in that fiscal year.

The destruction of Challenger and subsequent halt of the Space Shuttle Program led to the cancellation of the mission.

This is one of a set of three patches created based on the concept artwork for the missions. They may be unauthroized reproductions.

Size: 
4" / 100mm
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STS-62A - 4" - Concept

STS-62-A was a planned Space Shuttle mission to deliver a reconnaissance payload (Teal Ruby) into polar orbit. It was expected to use Discovery. It would have been the first manned launch from Vandenberg Air Force Base, California. The mission designation, 62-A, meant: 6=fiscal year 1986, 2=Vandenberg (1=Kennedy Space Center), and A=first flight in that fiscal year.

The destruction of Challenger and subsequent halt of the Space Shuttle Program led to the cancellation of the mission.

This is one of a set of three patches created based on the concept artwork for the missions. They may be unauthroized reproductions.

Size: 
4" / 100mm
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STS-35 - 4" - Unknown maker

STS-35 was the tenth flight of Space Shuttle Columbia, the 38th shuttle flight, and a mission devoted to astronomical observations with ASTRO-1, a Spacelab observatory consisting of four telescopes. The mission launched from Kennedy Space Center in Florida on 2 December 1990.

An in-depth write up about various versions of the STS-35 patch and variations can be found here.

White border version, twill background (not fully-embroidered). Taped tail suggests Cape Kennedy Medals.

There is also a matching 3" version.

Size: 
4" / 100mm
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STS-35 - 4" - Unknown maker

STS-35 was the tenth flight of Space Shuttle Columbia, the 38th shuttle flight, and a mission devoted to astronomical observations with ASTRO-1, a Spacelab observatory consisting of four telescopes. The mission launched from Kennedy Space Center in Florida on 2 December 1990.

An in-depth write up about various versions of the STS-35 patch and variations can be found here.

The "Astro 1" lettering in this patch is smaller than in A-B Emblem version.

Size: 
4" / 100mm
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STS-8 - 4" - Unknown maker

STS-8 was a NASA Space Shuttle mission which launched on 30 August 1983 and landed on 5 September; it conducted the first night launch and night landing of the program, and flew the first African-American astronaut, Guion Bluford. The mission was a notable success, achieving all of its planned research objectives, but was marred by the subsequent discovery that a solid-fuel rocket booster had almost malfunctioned catastrophically during the launch. STS-8 was the eighth Shuttle mission and the third flight of the Space Shuttle Challenger.
The primary payload was INSAT-1B, an Indian communications and weather observation satellite, which was released by the orbiter and boosted into a geostationary orbit. The secondary payload, replacing a delayed NASA communications satellite, was a four-metric-ton dummy payload, intended to test the use of the shuttle's "Canadarm" remote manipulator system. Scientific experiments carried on board Challenger included the environmental testing of new hardware and materials designed for future spacecraft, the study of biological materials in electric fields under microgravity, and research into space adaptation syndrome (also known as "space sickness"). The flight furthermore served as shakedown testing for the previously launched TDRS-1 satellite, which would be required to support the subsequent STS-9 mission.

Size: 
4" / 100mm
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STS-35 - 3" - Unknown maker

 

STS-35 was the tenth flight of Space Shuttle Columbia, the 38th shuttle flight, and a mission devoted to astronomical observations with ASTRO-1, a Spacelab observatory consisting of four telescopes. The mission launched from Kennedy Space Center in Florida on 2 December 1990.

An in-depth write up about the A-B Emblem version of the STS-35 patch and variations can be found here.

 

Size: 
3" / 76mm
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STS-35 - 4" - Unknown maker - white border

 

STS-35 was the tenth flight of Space Shuttle Columbia, the 38th shuttle flight, and a mission devoted to astronomical observations with ASTRO-1, a Spacelab observatory consisting of four telescopes. The mission launched from Kennedy Space Center in Florida on 2 December 1990.

An in-depth write up about the A-B Emblem version of the STS-35 patch and variations can be found here.

This patch has a white inner border, a trait of the original artwork of the STS-35 emblem. The stars are noticebly smaller in this version than the other 'white border' version and uses a smaller typeface for the names.

Size: 
4" / 100mm
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STS-35 - 4" - Eagle Crest Emblem - white border

 

STS-35 was the tenth flight of Space Shuttle Columbia, the 38th shuttle flight, and a mission devoted to astronomical observations with ASTRO-1, a Spacelab observatory consisting of four telescopes. The mission launched from Kennedy Space Center in Florida on 2 December 1990.

An in-depth write up about the A-B Emblem version of the STS-35 patch and variations can be found here.

This patch has a white inner border, a trait of the original artwork of the STS-35 emblem.

Size: 
4" / 100mm
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STS-35 - 4" - A-B Emblem

STS-35 was the tenth flight of Space Shuttle Columbia, the 38th shuttle flight, and a mission devoted to astronomical observations with ASTRO-1, a Spacelab observatory consisting of four telescopes. The mission launched from Kennedy Space Center in Florida on 2 December 1990.

An in-depth write up about the A-B Emblem version of the STS-35 patch and variations can be found here.

 

Size: 
4" / 100mm
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STS-62A "Revisited"

 

Growing up in Bakersfield, California presented many opportunities to view a space shuttle landing at Edwards Air Force Base. Financial burdens and military obligations (as an adult), however, prevented me from viewing an actual space shuttle launch. The launch of STS-62A would have afforded me the best opportunity to see a space shuttle launch. Many years later, I entertained the idea of creating my own design for STS-62A.

The design for "STS-62A Revisited" is simple due to the classified nature of the mission. The colors were loosely based upon the colors of the Air Force Achievement Medal and the NASA "meatball" emblem. The white stars within the outer circle represented of each of the astronauts assigned to the mission. The four stars in space represent the space shuttle fleet at the time the STS-62A mission was approved - Enterprise, Columbia, Challenger, and Atlantis. (Note - remember that the role of Enterprise was important for the preparation and mock staging for a west coast launch). Discovery's silhouette orbiter over the "North Pole" expresses some ambiguity of its orientation in space, and is accompanied with the red flight path to signify the polar orbit launch. Halley's Comet was added to give an "artistic dating" to the patch.

"STS-62A Revisited" is 4 inch (10.16 cm) in diameter and is a fully embroidered patch. Availability is limited to 86 patches (referencing the year of launch) for sale. I have personally numbered and signed each patch. As of 07 May 2013, 47 patches remain. The patch is a first come basis; once they are gone, they are gone.

Eric Bangloy is selling the remaining patches for $6.50 each; two patches for $10.00. These prices includes packaging and handling. If you're interested in purchasing this patch, please send me an email at ebangloy@gmail.com Please place STS-62A “Revisited” in the subject line.

Eric would like to personally acknowledge and thank Tim Gagnon and Jorge Cartes for their diligent assistance in making "STS-62A Revisited" design a reality. 

Size: 
4" / 100mm
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3
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STS-27 - Swissartex

STS-27 was the 27th NASA Space Shuttle mission, and the third flight of Space Shuttle Atlantis. Launching on 2 December 1988 on a four-day mission, it was the second shuttle flight after the Space Shuttle Challenger disaster of January 1986. STS-27 carried a classified payload for the U.S. Department of Defense.

This version of the STS-27 patch was manufactured by Eagle Crest Emblem Inc. of Taiwan. (Formaly Swissartex Emblem Inc. of Asheville, NC.28814).

Size: 
4" / 100mm
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STS-27 - 3" - Unknown maker

STS-27 was the 27th NASA Space Shuttle mission, and the third flight of Space Shuttle Atlantis. Launching on 2 December 1988 on a four-day mission, it was the second shuttle flight after the Space Shuttle Challenger disaster of January 1986. STS-27 carried a classified payload for the U.S. Department of Defense.

The embroidery of the names is quite crude.

Size: 
3" / 76mm
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STS-27 - A-B Emblem (modern)

STS-27 was the 27th NASA Space Shuttle mission, and the third flight of Space Shuttle Atlantis. Launching on 2 December 1988 on a four-day mission, it was the second shuttle flight after the Space Shuttle Challenger disaster of January 1986. STS-27 carried a classified payload for the U.S. Department of Defense.

This is a modern version from A-B Emblem. The crew name embroidery is tighter than the original.

Size: 
4" / 100mm
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STS-27 - A-B Emblem

STS-27 was the 27th NASA Space Shuttle mission, and the third flight of Space Shuttle Atlantis. Launching on 2 December 1988 on a four-day mission, it was the second shuttle flight after the Space Shuttle Challenger disaster of January 1986. STS-27 carried a classified payload for the U.S. Department of Defense.

Size: 
4" / 100mm
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STS-51A Unknown maker

STS-51-A was the 14th flight of NASA's Space Shuttle program, and the second flight of Space Shuttle Discovery. The mission launched from Kennedy Space Center on 8 November 1984, and landed just under eight days later on 16 November.
STS-51-A marked the first time a shuttle deployed two communications satellites, and retrieved from orbit two other communications satellites. The Canadian Anik D2 and Syncom IV-1 satellites were both successfully deployed by the crew of Discovery. Palapa B2 and Westar 6, meanwhile, had been deployed during the STS-41-B mission earlier in the year, but had been placed into improper orbits due to the malfunctioning of their kick motors; they were both safely recovered and returned to Earth during STS-51-A.

Size: 
4" / 100mm
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STS-51A - Swissartex

STS-51-A was the 14th flight of NASA's Space Shuttle program, and the second flight of Space Shuttle Discovery. The mission launched from Kennedy Space Center on 8 November 1984, and landed just under eight days later on 16 November.
STS-51-A marked the first time a shuttle deployed two communications satellites, and retrieved from orbit two other communications satellites. The Canadian Anik D2 and Syncom IV-1 satellites were both successfully deployed by the crew of Discovery. Palapa B2 and Westar 6, meanwhile, had been deployed during the STS-41-B mission earlier in the year, but had been placed into improper orbits due to the malfunctioning of their kick motors; they were both safely recovered and returned to Earth during STS-51-A.

The Swissartex features a radial border area.

Size: 
4" / 100mm
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STS-51A - Cape Kennedy Medals

STS-51-A was the 14th flight of NASA's Space Shuttle program, and the second flight of Space Shuttle Discovery. The mission launched from Kennedy Space Center on 8 November 1984, and landed just under eight days later on 16 November.
STS-51-A marked the first time a shuttle deployed two communications satellites, and retrieved from orbit two other communications satellites. The Canadian Anik D2 and Syncom IV-1 satellites were both successfully deployed by the crew of Discovery. Palapa B2 and Westar 6, meanwhile, had been deployed during the STS-41-B mission earlier in the year, but had been placed into improper orbits due to the malfunctioning of their kick motors; they were both safely recovered and returned to Earth during STS-51-A.

Size: 
4" / 100mm
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STA-51A - Lion Brothers

STS-51-A was the 14th flight of NASA's Space Shuttle program, and the second flight of Space Shuttle Discovery. The mission launched from Kennedy Space Center on 8 November 1984, and landed just under eight days later on 16 November.
STS-51-A marked the first time a shuttle deployed two communications satellites, and retrieved from orbit two other communications satellites. The Canadian Anik D2 and Syncom IV-1 satellites were both successfully deployed by the crew of Discovery. Palapa B2 and Westar 6, meanwhile, had been deployed during the STS-41-B mission earlier in the year, but had been placed into improper orbits due to the malfunctioning of their kick motors; they were both safely recovered and returned to Earth during STS-51-A.

The Lion Brothers uses an orange thread on the beak and eagle wing edge. The eagle neck feathers are also more defined.

Size: 
4" / 100mm
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STS-51A - A-B Emblem

STS-51-A was the 14th flight of NASA's Space Shuttle program, and the second flight of Space Shuttle Discovery. The mission launched from Kennedy Space Center on 8 November 1984, and landed just under eight days later on 16 November.
STS-51-A marked the first time a shuttle deployed two communications satellites, and retrieved from orbit two other communications satellites. The Canadian Anik D2 and Syncom IV-1 satellites were both successfully deployed by the crew of Discovery. Palapa B2 and Westar 6, meanwhile, had been deployed during the STS-41-B mission earlier in the year, but had been placed into improper orbits due to the malfunctioning of their kick motors; they were both safely recovered and returned to Earth during STS-51-A.

Size: 
4" / 100mm
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STS-8 "Eyes" Cape Kennedy Medals 3"

This patch was designed by STS-8 Pilot Dan Brandenstein. In the right window are Commander Richard Truly's eyes, behind spectacles, looking casually at things to come. Truly was the only veteran on board STS-8. The wonders of spaceflight might have seemed routine to him, having previously flown aboard STS-2. In the left window four pairs of wide open eyes can be seen gazing out. The eyes of the four rookies; Dan Brandenstein, Dale Gardnet, Guy Bluford and Bill Thornton. 

Size: 
3" / 76mm
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STS-8 "Eyes" - unknown maker

This patch was designed by STS-8 Pilot Dan Brandenstein. In the right window are Commander Richard Truly's eyes, behind spectacles, looking casually at things to come. Truly was the only veteran on board STS-8. The wonders of spaceflight might have seemed routine to him, having previously flown aboard STS-2. In the left window four pairs of wide open eyes can be seen gazing out. The eyes of the four rookies; Dan Brandenstein, Dale Gardnet, Guy Bluford and Bill Thornton.

Size: 
4" / 100mm
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STS-8 - Lion Brothers

 

STS-8 was a NASA Space Shuttle mission which launched on 30 August 1983 and landed on 5 September; it conducted the first night launch and night landing of the program, and flew the first African-American astronaut, Guion Bluford. The mission was a notable success, achieving all of its planned research objectives, but was marred by the subsequent discovery that a solid-fuel rocket booster had almost malfunctioned catastrophically during the launch. STS-8 was the eighth Shuttle mission and the third flight of the Space Shuttle Challenger.

The primary payload was INSAT-1B, an Indian communications and weather observation satellite, which was released by the orbiter and boosted into a geostationary orbit. The secondary payload, replacing a delayed NASA communications satellite, was a four-metric-ton dummy payload, intended to test the use of the shuttle's "Canadarm" remote manipulator system. Scientific experiments carried on board Challenger included the environmental testing of new hardware and materials designed for future spacecraft, the study of biological materials in electric fields under microgravity, and research into space adaptation syndrome (also known as "space sickness"). The flight furthermore served as shakedown testing for the previously launched TDRS-1 satellite, which would be required to support the subsequent STS-9 mission.

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STS-8 - Cape Kennedy Medals

 

STS-8 was a NASA Space Shuttle mission which launched on 30 August 1983 and landed on 5 September; it conducted the first night launch and night landing of the program, and flew the first African-American astronaut, Guion Bluford. The mission was a notable success, achieving all of its planned research objectives, but was marred by the subsequent discovery that a solid-fuel rocket booster had almost malfunctioned catastrophically during the launch. STS-8 was the eighth Shuttle mission and the third flight of the Space Shuttle Challenger.

The primary payload was INSAT-1B, an Indian communications and weather observation satellite, which was released by the orbiter and boosted into a geostationary orbit. The secondary payload, replacing a delayed NASA communications satellite, was a four-metric-ton dummy payload, intended to test the use of the shuttle's "Canadarm" remote manipulator system. Scientific experiments carried on board Challenger included the environmental testing of new hardware and materials designed for future spacecraft, the study of biological materials in electric fields under microgravity, and research into space adaptation syndrome (also known as "space sickness"). The flight furthermore served as shakedown testing for the previously launched TDRS-1 satellite, which would be required to support the subsequent STS-9 mission.

Size: 
4" / 100mm
Project: 
Classification: 
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0
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0
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STS-8 - Swissartex

 

STS-8 was a NASA Space Shuttle mission which launched on 30 August 1983 and landed on 5 September; it conducted the first night launch and night landing of the program, and flew the first African-American astronaut, Guion Bluford. The mission was a notable success, achieving all of its planned research objectives, but was marred by the subsequent discovery that a solid-fuel rocket booster had almost malfunctioned catastrophically during the launch. STS-8 was the eighth Shuttle mission and the third flight of the Space Shuttle Challenger.

The primary payload was INSAT-1B, an Indian communications and weather observation satellite, which was released by the orbiter and boosted into a geostationary orbit. The secondary payload, replacing a delayed NASA communications satellite, was a four-metric-ton dummy payload, intended to test the use of the shuttle's "Canadarm" remote manipulator system. Scientific experiments carried on board Challenger included the environmental testing of new hardware and materials designed for future spacecraft, the study of biological materials in electric fields under microgravity, and research into space adaptation syndrome (also known as "space sickness"). The flight furthermore served as shakedown testing for the previously launched TDRS-1 satellite, which would be required to support the subsequent STS-9 mission.

Size: 
4" / 100mm
Project: 
Classification: 
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0
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STS-51A - Unknown maker

Launched November 8, 1984, landed November 16, 1984. Canadian communications satellite TELESAT-H (ANIK), attached to Payload Assist Module-D (PAM-D), deployed into geosynchronous orbit on flight day two. On third day, defense communications satellite SYNCOM IV-I (also known as LEASAT-1) deployed. Allen and Gardner, wearing jet-propelled manned maneuvering units, retrieved two malfunctioning satellites: PALAPA-B2 and WESTAR-VI, both deployed on Mission 41-B.

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STS-8 'Eyes'

This patch was designed by STS-8 Pilot Dan Brandenstein. In the right window are Commander Richard Truly's eyes, behind spectacles, looking casually at things to come. Truly was the only veteran on board STS-8. The wonders of spaceflight might have seemed routine to him, having previously flown aboard STS-2. In the left window four pairs of wide open eyes can be seen gazing out. The eyes of the four rookies; Dan Brandenstein, Dale Gardnet, Guy Bluford and Bill Thornton. Beware of oor quality copies of this patch that are known to exist.
This is the original version.

Size: 
4" / 100mm
Project: 
Classification: 
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STS-8 - A-B Emblem

STS-8 was a NASA Space Shuttle mission which launched on 30 August 1983 and landed on 5 September; it conducted the first night launch and night landing of the program, and flew the first African-American astronaut, Guion Bluford. The mission was a notable success, achieving all of its planned research objectives, but was marred by the subsequent discovery that a solid-fuel rocket booster had almost malfunctioned catastrophically during the launch. STS-8 was the eighth Shuttle mission and the third flight of the Space Shuttle Challenger.

The primary payload was INSAT-1B, an Indian communications and weather observation satellite, which was released by the orbiter and boosted into a geostationary orbit. The secondary payload, replacing a delayed NASA communications satellite, was a four-metric-ton dummy payload, intended to test the use of the shuttle's "Canadarm" remote manipulator system. Scientific experiments carried on board Challenger included the environmental testing of new hardware and materials designed for future spacecraft, the study of biological materials in electric fields under microgravity, and research into space adaptation syndrome (also known as "space sickness"). The flight furthermore served as shakedown testing for the previously launched TDRS-1 satellite, which would be required to support the subsequent STS-9 mission.

Size: 
4" / 100mm
Project: 
Classification: 
Rating: 
0
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0
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STS-35

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