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STS-35 - 4" A-B Emblem revised

The original STS-35 artwork differed significantly from the A-B Emblem STS-35" souvenir patch. A number of close reproductions by Cape Kennedy Medals and others have come close, but not matching the original prototype. In 2016, A-B Emblem, when stock of the older STS-35 patch ran out, produced a new version on their newer machines that more faithfully reflects the original artwork and prototype. This is the version currently on sale at their web site (as of September 2016). 

 

Size: 
4" / 100mm
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STS-51E - "Baudry" - 4" - Swissartex

This is the first version of the Swissartex STS-51E patch, made when CNES astronaut Patrick Baudry was added as a payload specialist. The body was already designed so he was added as a tab. A later crew change added Ed Garn which necessitated another patch change. Rather than destroying the patches produced up to that time, it was decided that the main body could be preserved and the Baudry tab could simple be cut off and the new Baudry/Garn tab could be glued on to the body. 

To date (2015) only 4 patches are known to have survived the removal of the tab and are in private collections.

Size: 
5" / 128mm
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STS-35 - 4" - Unknown maker

STS-35 was the tenth flight of Space Shuttle Columbia, the 38th shuttle flight, and a mission devoted to astronomical observations with ASTRO-1, a Spacelab observatory consisting of four telescopes. The mission launched from Kennedy Space Center in Florida on 2 December 1990.

An in-depth write up about various versions of the STS-35 patch and variations can be found here.

White border version, twill background (not fully-embroidered). Taped tail suggests Cape Kennedy Medals.

There is also a matching 3" version.

Size: 
4" / 100mm
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STS-35 - 4" - Unknown maker

STS-35 was the tenth flight of Space Shuttle Columbia, the 38th shuttle flight, and a mission devoted to astronomical observations with ASTRO-1, a Spacelab observatory consisting of four telescopes. The mission launched from Kennedy Space Center in Florida on 2 December 1990.

An in-depth write up about various versions of the STS-35 patch and variations can be found here.

The "Astro 1" lettering in this patch is smaller than in A-B Emblem version.

Size: 
4" / 100mm
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STS-61 - 4" - A-B Emblem

STS-61 was the first Hubble Space Telescope servicing mission, and the fifth flight of the Space Shuttle Endeavour. The mission launched on 2 December 1993 from Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The mission restored the spaceborne observatory's vision, marred by spherical aberration, with the installation of a new main camera and a corrective optics package. The flight also brought instrument upgrades and new solar arrays to the telescope. With its very heavy workload, the STS-61 mission was one of the most complex in the Shuttle's history. It lasted almost 11 days, and crew members made five spacewalks, an all-time record. Even the retrieval of Intelsat VI on STS-49 in May 1992 required only four. The flight plan allowed for two additional EVAs, which could have raised the total number to seven. The final two contingency EVAs were not made. In order to complete the mission without too much fatigue, the five extravehicular working sessions were shared between two alternating shifts of two astronauts.

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STS-46 - 4" - Unknown maker

STS-46 was a NASA space shuttle mission using orbiter Atlantis and launched on 31 July 1992 at 9:56:48 am EDT.

Mission's primary objectives were the deployment of the European Space Agency's EURECA (European Retrievable Carrier) and the joint NASA/Italian Space Agency Tethered Satellite System (TSS). EURECA was deployed a day later than scheduled because of a problem with its data handling system. Seven and a half hours after deployment, the spacecraft's thrusters were fired to boost EURECA to its planned operating altitude of around 310 miles. However, thruster firing was cut to six minutes from 24 minutes because of unexpected attitude data from the spacecraft. The problem was resolved, and EURECA was successfully boosted to its operational orbit on the mission's sixth day. TSS deployment also was delayed one day because of the problems with EURECA. During deployment, the satellite reached a maximum distance of only 860 feet from the orbiter instead of the planned 12.5 miles because of a jammed tether line. After numerous attempts over several days to free the tether, TSS operations were curtailed, and the satellite was stowed for return to Earth. Secondary payloads included: Evaluation of Oxygen Integration with Materials/Thermal Management Processes (EOIM-III/TEMP 2A), Consortium for Materials Development in Space Complex Autonomous Payload (CONCAP II and CONCAP III), IMAX Cargo Bay Camera (ICBC), Limited Duration Space Environment Candidate Materials Exposure (LDCE), Air Force Maui Optical Site (AMOS), Pituitary Growth Hormone Cell Function (PHCF), and Ultraviolet Plume Instrument (UVPI). Mission extended extra day to complete scientific objectives.

This verison is distinct in the colorization of the TSS sphere and the truss stitching. 

Size: 
4" / 100mm
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STS-46 - 4" - A-B Emblem (Modern)

STS-46 was a NASA space shuttle mission using orbiter Atlantis and launched on 31 July 1992 at 9:56:48 am EDT.

Mission's primary objectives were the deployment of the European Space Agency's EURECA (European Retrievable Carrier) and the joint NASA/Italian Space Agency Tethered Satellite System (TSS). EURECA was deployed a day later than scheduled because of a problem with its data handling system. Seven and a half hours after deployment, the spacecraft's thrusters were fired to boost EURECA to its planned operating altitude of around 310 miles. However, thruster firing was cut to six minutes from 24 minutes because of unexpected attitude data from the spacecraft. The problem was resolved, and EURECA was successfully boosted to its operational orbit on the mission's sixth day. TSS deployment also was delayed one day because of the problems with EURECA. During deployment, the satellite reached a maximum distance of only 860 feet from the orbiter instead of the planned 12.5 miles because of a jammed tether line. After numerous attempts over several days to free the tether, TSS operations were curtailed, and the satellite was stowed for return to Earth. Secondary payloads included: Evaluation of Oxygen Integration with Materials/Thermal Management Processes (EOIM-III/TEMP 2A), Consortium for Materials Development in Space Complex Autonomous Payload (CONCAP II and CONCAP III), IMAX Cargo Bay Camera (ICBC), Limited Duration Space Environment Candidate Materials Exposure (LDCE), Air Force Maui Optical Site (AMOS), Pituitary Growth Hormone Cell Function (PHCF), and Ultraviolet Plume Instrument (UVPI). Mission extended extra day to complete scientific objectives.

The STS-46 as issued by A-B Emblem can be identified by the black border around the flags. An older version from A-B Emblem also exists.

Size: 
4" / 100mm
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STS-46 - 4" - A-B Emblem

STS-46 was a NASA space shuttle mission using orbiter Atlantis and launched on 31 July 1992 at 9:56:48 am EDT.

Mission's primary objectives were the deployment of the European Space Agency's EURECA (European Retrievable Carrier) and the joint NASA/Italian Space Agency Tethered Satellite System (TSS). EURECA was deployed a day later than scheduled because of a problem with its data handling system. Seven and a half hours after deployment, the spacecraft's thrusters were fired to boost EURECA to its planned operating altitude of around 310 miles. However, thruster firing was cut to six minutes from 24 minutes because of unexpected attitude data from the spacecraft. The problem was resolved, and EURECA was successfully boosted to its operational orbit on the mission's sixth day. TSS deployment also was delayed one day because of the problems with EURECA. During deployment, the satellite reached a maximum distance of only 860 feet from the orbiter instead of the planned 12.5 miles because of a jammed tether line. After numerous attempts over several days to free the tether, TSS operations were curtailed, and the satellite was stowed for return to Earth. Secondary payloads included: Evaluation of Oxygen Integration with Materials/Thermal Management Processes (EOIM-III/TEMP 2A), Consortium for Materials Development in Space Complex Autonomous Payload (CONCAP II and CONCAP III), IMAX Cargo Bay Camera (ICBC), Limited Duration Space Environment Candidate Materials Exposure (LDCE), Air Force Maui Optical Site (AMOS), Pituitary Growth Hormone Cell Function (PHCF), and Ultraviolet Plume Instrument (UVPI). Mission extended extra day to complete scientific objectives.

The STS-46 as issued by A-B Emblem can be identified by the black border around the flags. A modern version also exists.

Size: 
4" / 100mm
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STS-35 - 3" - Unknown maker

 

STS-35 was the tenth flight of Space Shuttle Columbia, the 38th shuttle flight, and a mission devoted to astronomical observations with ASTRO-1, a Spacelab observatory consisting of four telescopes. The mission launched from Kennedy Space Center in Florida on 2 December 1990.

An in-depth write up about the A-B Emblem version of the STS-35 patch and variations can be found here.

 

Size: 
3" / 76mm
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STS-35 - 4" - Unknown maker - white border

 

STS-35 was the tenth flight of Space Shuttle Columbia, the 38th shuttle flight, and a mission devoted to astronomical observations with ASTRO-1, a Spacelab observatory consisting of four telescopes. The mission launched from Kennedy Space Center in Florida on 2 December 1990.

An in-depth write up about the A-B Emblem version of the STS-35 patch and variations can be found here.

This patch has a white inner border, a trait of the original artwork of the STS-35 emblem. The stars are noticebly smaller in this version than the other 'white border' version and uses a smaller typeface for the names.

Size: 
4" / 100mm
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STS-35 - 4" - Eagle Crest Emblem - white border

 

STS-35 was the tenth flight of Space Shuttle Columbia, the 38th shuttle flight, and a mission devoted to astronomical observations with ASTRO-1, a Spacelab observatory consisting of four telescopes. The mission launched from Kennedy Space Center in Florida on 2 December 1990.

An in-depth write up about the A-B Emblem version of the STS-35 patch and variations can be found here.

This patch has a white inner border, a trait of the original artwork of the STS-35 emblem.

Size: 
4" / 100mm
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STS-35 - 4" - A-B Emblem

STS-35 was the tenth flight of Space Shuttle Columbia, the 38th shuttle flight, and a mission devoted to astronomical observations with ASTRO-1, a Spacelab observatory consisting of four telescopes. The mission launched from Kennedy Space Center in Florida on 2 December 1990.

An in-depth write up about the A-B Emblem version of the STS-35 patch and variations can be found here.

 

Size: 
4" / 100mm
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STS-61E - Unknown maker

This patch is for STS-61E which was cancelled after the STS-51L (Challenger) mishap.

 

Many reproductions exist of this patch. This one has softer corners on the simulated tab (the "original" version has a sewn on tab). The stitching is clean. Some alegedly purchased at the Edwards Air Force Base gift shop.

Size: 
4" / 100mm
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STS-61E - Randy Hunt reproduction

This patch is for STS-61E which was cancelled after the STS-51L (Challenger) mishap. 

This is version is a reproduction of the "original" version as seen on some of the crew's suits. This is a single piece tab that attempts to reproduce the odd bowed apron of the original.

Size: 
4" / 100mm
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STS-61E - Modern Reproduction - Unknown source

This patch is for STS-61E which was cancelled after the STS-51L (Challenger) mishap.

 

Many reproductions exist of this patch. This one is notable for the lowercase typeface that resembles the version in the crew photos. Other reproductions, including the "official" version are in uppercase lettering. This patch would be the most accurate to the original STS-61E artwork:

 

 

Above images from spacefacts.de

 

Size: 
4" / 100mm
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STS-61E - Modern Reproduction - Unknown source

This patch is for STS-61E which was cancelled after the STS-51L (Challenger) mishap. 

Many reproductions exist of this patch. This one isn't as accurate, the tab is different. The back is bare cloth with a taped tail.

Size: 
4" / 100mm
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STS-51E - A-B Emblem

Mission objective was to deploy the TDRS-B communication satellite, cancelled due to IUS failure. Most of the crew would be reassigned to STS-51-D which flew in April 1985 (except for Patrick Baudry, who was re-assigned to STS-51-G which flew in June 1985).

 

The A-B Emblem patch has a cut edge around the body and a sew-on tab. There are two colors of twill background, dark and light bluie. There are also two colors of sew on tabs, a dark blue and light blue as seen in the photos:

 

  • Type 1, Dark blue main body with dark blue tab. (Hard to find).
  • Type 2, Dark blue main body with a light blue tab. (Very Rare). 
  • Type 2A, Light blue main body with a dark blue tab. (Extremely Rare).
  • Type 3, Light blue main body with a light blue tab. (Hard to find), but the most common of the 4 patches. 

The photo on this page are the "Type 1" issue.

Size: 
4" / 100mm
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3
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STS-51E - 3" - Swissartex

Mission objective was to deploy the TDRS-B communication satellite, cancelled due to IUS failure. Most of the crew would be reassigned to STS-51-D which flew in April 1985 (except for Patrick Baudry, who was re-assigned to STS-51-G which flew in June 1985).

 

The Swissartex patch has a merrowed edge all the way around the body and a sew-on tab. 

Size: 
3" / 76mm
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STS-51D - Swissartex

 STS-51-D was the sixteenth flight of NASA's Space Shuttle program, and the fourth flight of Space Shuttle Discovery.[1] The launch of STS-51-D from Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida, on 12 April 1985 was delayed by 55 minutes, after a boat strayed into the restricted Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) recovery zone. STS-51-D was the third shuttle mission to be extended.

The Swissartex version has a merrowed edge all around and a stiched on tab. Some may have been recycled from the tab-less, cancelled STS-41F patches.

Swissartex Emblem Inc. also manufactured a one piece version of this patch but with a shiny vacuum sealed backing instead of the waxy matt plastic coated backing (second set of photos). 

Size: 
4" / 100mm
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STS-51D - Eagle Crest Emblem

STS-51-D was the sixteenth flight of NASA's Space Shuttle program, and the fourth flight of Space Shuttle Discovery.[1] The launch of STS-51-D from Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida, on 12 April 1985 was delayed by 55 minutes, after a boat strayed into the restricted Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) recovery zone. STS-51-D was the third shuttle mission to be extended.

This is an apparent modern reproduction, single piece patch, fully merrowed edge.

This STS-51D patch could be manufactured by Eagle Crest Emblem Inc. (formaly Swissartex Emblem Inc.). Swissartex manufactured a one piece vacuum sealed backed version nearly identical to the image above. The one shown above has a shiny plastic coated backing to it which fits in with Eagle Crest Emblem Inc. patches.

Size: 
4" / 100mm
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STS-51D - A-B Emblem

STS-51-D was the sixteenth flight of NASA's Space Shuttle program, and the fourth flight of Space Shuttle Discovery.[1] The launch of STS-51-D from Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida, on 12 April 1985 was delayed by 55 minutes, after a boat strayed into the restricted Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) recovery zone. STS-51-D was the third shuttle mission to be extended.

Below are two versions of the A-B Emblem STS-51D patch. The mid-blue and light blue versions. The mid-blue is more difficult to find.  There is also an AB Emblem example were the main body of the patch is an original STS-41F patch, but with a mid blue 'tab' sewn onto the bottom to make the whole patch a STS-51D. 

Size: 
4" / 100mm
Project: 
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2
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STS-41F - Swissartex

STS-41F, scheduled for launch on Discovery, had a crew of five whose names were arranged around the body of the patch. The STS-41F mission was cancelled not long before the scheduled launch and a series of crew reassignments and orbiter and payload changes followed. Eventually the original crew found themselves scheduled to fly again on Discovery with two additional mission specialists added, making it possible to reuse the original STS-41F insignia with just an additional name tab at the bottom. This allowed AB Emblems and Swissartex, who had apparently already begun manufacturing patches for the STS-41F mission, to re-use these patch bodies for the STS-51D mission with sew on name tabs at the bottom.

Size: 
4" / 100mm
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STS-61E (Original)

This patch is for STS-61E which was cancelled after the STS-51L (Challenger) mishap. This patch image represents the actual patch, which is extremely rare. It varies slightly from the recent copies that are also quite scarce. 

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5
Average: 5 (1 vote)

STS-35

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