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STS-51E - "Baudry" - 4" - Swissartex

This is the first version of the Swissartex STS-51E patch, made when CNES astronaut Patrick Baudry was added as a payload specialist. The body was already designed so he was added as a tab. A later crew change added Ed Garn which necessitated another patch change. Rather than destroying the patches produced up to that time, it was decided that the main body could be preserved and the Baudry tab could simple be cut off and the new Baudry/Garn tab could be glued on to the body. 

To date (2015) only 4 patches are known to have survived the removal of the tab and are in private collections.

Size: 
5" / 128mm
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STS-6 - Lion Brothers - Early Edition

STS-6 was a NASA Space Shuttle mission conducted using Space Shuttle Challenger, carrying the first Tracking and Data Relay Satellite, TDRS-1, into orbit. Launched on 4 April 1983, STS-6 was the sixth shuttle mission and the first of the ten missions flown by Challenger. The mission took off from Kennedy Space Center's launch pad 39A, and landed at Edwards Air Force Base on 9 April. This was the first Space Shuttle mission during which a spacewalk was conducted, and the first in which the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) was used.

This version differs slightly from the regular Lion Brothers STS-6 patch and is much more scarce. 

Size: 
4" / 100mm
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Apollo-Soyuz Test Project - Support crew patch

"Troop" = Richard H. Truly
"Bo Bob" = Karol J. Bobko
"Crip" = Robert L. Crippen

"Johnny" = Dzhanibekov
"Boris" = Andreyev
"Yuri" = Romanenko
"Sasha" = Ivanchenko

Extremely rare.

Size: 
5" / 128mm
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STS-51E - A-B Emblem

Mission objective was to deploy the TDRS-B communication satellite, cancelled due to IUS failure. Most of the crew would be reassigned to STS-51-D which flew in April 1985 (except for Patrick Baudry, who was re-assigned to STS-51-G which flew in June 1985).

 

The A-B Emblem patch has a cut edge around the body and a sew-on tab. There are two colors of twill background, dark and light bluie. There are also two colors of sew on tabs, a dark blue and light blue as seen in the photos:

 

  • Type 1, Dark blue main body with dark blue tab. (Hard to find).
  • Type 2, Dark blue main body with a light blue tab. (Very Rare). 
  • Type 2A, Light blue main body with a dark blue tab. (Extremely Rare).
  • Type 3, Light blue main body with a light blue tab. (Hard to find), but the most common of the 4 patches. 

The photo on this page are the "Type 1" issue.

Size: 
4" / 100mm
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STS-51E - 3" - Swissartex

Mission objective was to deploy the TDRS-B communication satellite, cancelled due to IUS failure. Most of the crew would be reassigned to STS-51-D which flew in April 1985 (except for Patrick Baudry, who was re-assigned to STS-51-G which flew in June 1985).

 

The Swissartex patch has a merrowed edge all the way around the body and a sew-on tab. 

Size: 
3" / 76mm
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STS-51E - Swissartex

Mission objective was to deploy the TDRS-B communication satellite, cancelled due to IUS failure. Most of the crew would be reassigned to STS-51-D which flew in April 1985 (except for Patrick Baudry, who was re-assigned to STS-51-G which flew in June 1985).

The Swissartex patch has a merrowed edge all the way around the body and a sew-on tab. There are two colors of sew on tabs, a dark blue and light blue as seen in the photos.

Size: 
4" / 100mm
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STS-51J - Swissartex

STS-51-J launched on 3 October 1985, at 11:15 EDT, from launch pad 39A at the Kennedy Space Center. The launch was delayed by 22 minutes and 30 seconds due to a problem with a main engine liquid hydrogen prevalve close remote power controller; the controller was showing a faulty "on" indication.
The mission was the second shuttle flight totally dedicated to deploying a Department of Defense payload, after STS-51-C. Its cargo was classified, but it was reported that two (USA-11 and USA-12) DSCS-III (Defense Satellite Communications System) satellites were launched into stationary orbits by an Inertial Upper Stage. The DSCS satellites used X-band frequencies (8/7 GHz). Each DSCS-III satellite had a design life of ten years, although several of the DSCS satellites have far exceeded their design life expectancy.
The mission was deemed successful. After a flight lasting 4 days, 1 hour and 45 minutes, Atlantis landed on Runway 23 at Edwards Air Force Base at 13:00 EDT on 7 October 1985. During STS-51-J, mission commander Karol Bobko became the first astronaut to fly on three different shuttle orbiters, and the only astronaut to fly on the maiden voyages of two different shuttles.

This version of the STS-51J patch was manufactured by Swissartex Emblem Inc. if it has a waxy matt plastic coated backing, or a vacuum sealed backing. Or if it is the modern version with a shiny plastic coated backing then it is Eagle Crest Emblem Inc. of Taiwan.

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STS-51J - Unknown maker

STS-51-J launched on 3 October 1985, at 11:15 EDT, from launch pad 39A at the Kennedy Space Center. The launch was delayed by 22 minutes and 30 seconds due to a problem with a main engine liquid hydrogen prevalve close remote power controller; the controller was showing a faulty "on" indication.
The mission was the second shuttle flight totally dedicated to deploying a Department of Defense payload, after STS-51-C. Its cargo was classified, but it was reported that two (USA-11 and USA-12) DSCS-III (Defense Satellite Communications System) satellites were launched into stationary orbits by an Inertial Upper Stage. The DSCS satellites used X-band frequencies (8/7 GHz). Each DSCS-III satellite had a design life of ten years, although several of the DSCS satellites have far exceeded their design life expectancy.
The mission was deemed successful. After a flight lasting 4 days, 1 hour and 45 minutes, Atlantis landed on Runway 23 at Edwards Air Force Base at 13:00 EDT on 7 October 1985. During STS-51-J, mission commander Karol Bobko became the first astronaut to fly on three different shuttle orbiters, and the only astronaut to fly on the maiden voyages of two different shuttles.

Single-piece construction with nice detail.

Size: 
4" / 100mm
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STS-51J - A-B Emblem

STS-51-J launched on 3 October 1985, at 11:15 EDT, from launch pad 39A at the Kennedy Space Center. The launch was delayed by 22 minutes and 30 seconds due to a problem with a main engine liquid hydrogen prevalve close remote power controller; the controller was showing a faulty "on" indication.
The mission was the second shuttle flight totally dedicated to deploying a Department of Defense payload, after STS-51-C. Its cargo was classified, but it was reported that two (USA-11 and USA-12) DSCS-III (Defense Satellite Communications System) satellites were launched into stationary orbits by an Inertial Upper Stage. The DSCS satellites used X-band frequencies (8/7 GHz). Each DSCS-III satellite had a design life of ten years, although several of the DSCS satellites have far exceeded their design life expectancy.
The mission was deemed successful. After a flight lasting 4 days, 1 hour and 45 minutes, Atlantis landed on Runway 23 at Edwards Air Force Base at 13:00 EDT on 7 October 1985. During STS-51-J, mission commander Karol Bobko became the first astronaut to fly on three different shuttle orbiters, and the only astronaut to fly on the maiden voyages of two different shuttles.

The A-B Emblem patch features a sewn-on tab.

Size: 
4" / 100mm
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STS-51D - Swissartex

 STS-51-D was the sixteenth flight of NASA's Space Shuttle program, and the fourth flight of Space Shuttle Discovery.[1] The launch of STS-51-D from Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida, on 12 April 1985 was delayed by 55 minutes, after a boat strayed into the restricted Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) recovery zone. STS-51-D was the third shuttle mission to be extended.

The Swissartex version has a merrowed edge all around and a stiched on tab. Some may have been recycled from the tab-less, cancelled STS-41F patches.

Swissartex Emblem Inc. also manufactured a one piece version of this patch but with a shiny vacuum sealed backing instead of the waxy matt plastic coated backing (second set of photos). 

Size: 
4" / 100mm
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STS-51D - Eagle Crest Emblem

STS-51-D was the sixteenth flight of NASA's Space Shuttle program, and the fourth flight of Space Shuttle Discovery.[1] The launch of STS-51-D from Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida, on 12 April 1985 was delayed by 55 minutes, after a boat strayed into the restricted Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) recovery zone. STS-51-D was the third shuttle mission to be extended.

This is an apparent modern reproduction, single piece patch, fully merrowed edge.

This STS-51D patch could be manufactured by Eagle Crest Emblem Inc. (formaly Swissartex Emblem Inc.). Swissartex manufactured a one piece vacuum sealed backed version nearly identical to the image above. The one shown above has a shiny plastic coated backing to it which fits in with Eagle Crest Emblem Inc. patches.

Size: 
4" / 100mm
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STS-51D - A-B Emblem

STS-51-D was the sixteenth flight of NASA's Space Shuttle program, and the fourth flight of Space Shuttle Discovery.[1] The launch of STS-51-D from Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida, on 12 April 1985 was delayed by 55 minutes, after a boat strayed into the restricted Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) recovery zone. STS-51-D was the third shuttle mission to be extended.

Below are two versions of the A-B Emblem STS-51D patch. The mid-blue and light blue versions. The mid-blue is more difficult to find.  There is also an AB Emblem example were the main body of the patch is an original STS-41F patch, but with a mid blue 'tab' sewn onto the bottom to make the whole patch a STS-51D. 

Size: 
4" / 100mm
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STS-41F - Swissartex

STS-41F, scheduled for launch on Discovery, had a crew of five whose names were arranged around the body of the patch. The STS-41F mission was cancelled not long before the scheduled launch and a series of crew reassignments and orbiter and payload changes followed. Eventually the original crew found themselves scheduled to fly again on Discovery with two additional mission specialists added, making it possible to reuse the original STS-41F insignia with just an additional name tab at the bottom. This allowed AB Emblems and Swissartex, who had apparently already begun manufacturing patches for the STS-41F mission, to re-use these patch bodies for the STS-51D mission with sew on name tabs at the bottom.

Size: 
4" / 100mm
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STS-6 - Cape Kennedy Medals

STS-6 was a NASA Space Shuttle mission conducted using Space Shuttle Challenger, carrying the first Tracking and Data Relay Satellite, TDRS-1, into orbit. Launched on 4 April 1983, STS-6 was the sixth shuttle mission and the first of the ten missions flown by Challenger. The mission took off from Kennedy Space Center's launch pad 39A, and landed at Edwards Air Force Base on 9 April. This was the first Space Shuttle mission during which a spacewalk was conducted, and the first in which the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) was used.

The font is very thick on the Cape Kennedy Medals version

Size: 
4" / 100mm
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STS-6 - Swissartex

STS-6 was a NASA Space Shuttle mission conducted using Space Shuttle Challenger, carrying the first Tracking and Data Relay Satellite, TDRS-1, into orbit. Launched on 4 April 1983, STS-6 was the sixth shuttle mission and the first of the ten missions flown by Challenger. The mission took off from Kennedy Space Center's launch pad 39A, and landed at Edwards Air Force Base on 9 April. This was the first Space Shuttle mission during which a spacewalk was conducted, and the first in which the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) was used.

Size: 
4" / 100mm
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STS-6 - modern version

STS-6 was a NASA Space Shuttle mission conducted using Space Shuttle Challenger, carrying the first Tracking and Data Relay Satellite, TDRS-1, into orbit. Launched on 4 April 1983, STS-6 was the sixth shuttle mission and the first of the ten missions flown by Challenger. The mission took off from Kennedy Space Center's launch pad 39A, and landed at Edwards Air Force Base on 9 April. This was the first Space Shuttle mission during which a spacewalk was conducted, and the first in which the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) was used.

This patch is a modern reproduction. Unknown manufacturer.

Size: 
4" / 100mm
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STS-6 - Lion Brothers

STS-6 was a NASA Space Shuttle mission conducted using Space Shuttle Challenger, carrying the first Tracking and Data Relay Satellite, TDRS-1, into orbit. Launched on 4 April 1983, STS-6 was the sixth shuttle mission and the first of the ten missions flown by Challenger. The mission took off from Kennedy Space Center's launch pad 39A, and landed at Edwards Air Force Base on 9 April. This was the first Space Shuttle mission during which a spacewalk was conducted, and the first in which the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) was used.

The names of the astronauts are larger than the A-B Emblem version and the IUS is stitched narrower.

Size: 
4" / 100mm
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STS-6 - 4" - A-B Emblem

STS-6 was a NASA Space Shuttle mission conducted using Space Shuttle Challenger, carrying the first Tracking and Data Relay Satellite, TDRS-1, into orbit. Launched on 4 April 1983, STS-6 was the sixth shuttle mission and the first of the ten missions flown by Challenger. The mission took off from Kennedy Space Center's launch pad 39A, and landed at Edwards Air Force Base on 9 April. This was the first Space Shuttle mission during which a spacewalk was conducted, and the first in which the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) was used.

Size: 
4" / 100mm
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Skylab Medical Experiment Altitude Tet (SMEAT) (Snoopy

SMEAT stands for, Skylab Medical Experiments Altitude Tests. In the Summer of 1972 astronauts Robert Crippen, Karol Bobko and Bill Thornton spent 56 days in a Skylab mock-up at the Manned Spacecraft Center's altitude chamber to simulate the actual conditions that flight crews would experience in orbit. The test provided extensive medical data, but the mock-up did not contain duplicates of the experiments that would fly on Skylab and so the crew had plenty of time to read books, assemble model cars and learn how to speak Russian. Later Crippen and Bobko would perform support roles on the Apollo-Soyuz mission in 1975.
This is a modern reproduction

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