5" / 128mm

STS-51E - "Baudry" - 4" - Swissartex

This is the first version of the Swissartex STS-51E patch, made when CNES astronaut Patrick Baudry was added as a payload specialist. The body was already designed so he was added as a tab. A later crew change added Ed Garn which necessitated another patch change. Rather than destroying the patches produced up to that time, it was decided that the main body could be preserved and the Baudry tab could simple be cut off and the new Baudry/Garn tab could be glued on to the body. 

To date (2015) only 4 patches are known to have survived the removal of the tab and are in private collections.

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Expedition 41 - 4" - TsENKI

Expedition 41 was the 41st expedition to the International Space Station. It began on 10 September 2014 with the undocking of Soyuz TMA-12M, returning the crew of Expedition 40 to Earth.

The expedition ended with the undocking of Soyuz TMA-13M on November 10, 2014. The remainder of Expedition 41's crew joined Expedition 42.

The Expedition 41 crew members have released their patch and have written some text to go along with it: "Portraying the road of human exploration into our vastly unknown universe, all elements of the Expedition 41 patch build from the foundation, our Earth, to the stars beyond our solar system. The focus of our six-month expedition to the International Space Station (ISS) is Earth and its inhabitants as well as a scientific look out into our universe. The distinguishing ISS solar arrays reach onward and serve as the central element, with the icon of an atom underneath representing the multitude of research onboard that will bring new discoveries for the benefit of humanity. The sun is rising over Earth's horizon, spreading its light along the road of human exploration. Equipped with the knowledge and inspiration gained from ISS, our successful multinational cooperation will lead human space exploration to the moon, Mars, and ultimately, the stars. We are Expedition 41. Join us for the adventure."

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Expedition 41 - 4" - A-B Emblem

Expedition 41 was the 41st expedition to the International Space Station. It began on 10 September 2014 with the undocking of Soyuz TMA-12M, returning the crew of Expedition 40 to Earth.

The expedition ended with the undocking of Soyuz TMA-13M on November 10, 2014. The remainder of Expedition 41's crew joined Expedition 42.

The Expedition 41 crew members have released their patch and have written some text to go along with it: "Portraying the road of human exploration into our vastly unknown universe, all elements of the Expedition 41 patch build from the foundation, our Earth, to the stars beyond our solar system. The focus of our six-month expedition to the International Space Station (ISS) is Earth and its inhabitants as well as a scientific look out into our universe. The distinguishing ISS solar arrays reach onward and serve as the central element, with the icon of an atom underneath representing the multitude of research onboard that will bring new discoveries for the benefit of humanity. The sun is rising over Earth's horizon, spreading its light along the road of human exploration. Equipped with the knowledge and inspiration gained from ISS, our successful multinational cooperation will lead human space exploration to the moon, Mars, and ultimately, the stars. We are Expedition 41. Join us for the adventure."

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Expedition 38 - TsENKI

Expedition 38 is the 38th expedition to the International Space Station.

This patch was produced for Center for operation of space ground-based infrastructure (TsENKI) in Baikonur and are difficult to find.

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Expedition 38 - A-B Emblem

Expedition 38 is the 38th expedition to the International Space Station.

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ISS Expedition 36 - TsENKI

Expedition 36 was the 36th long-duration mission to the International Space Station.
On 2013 June 16, the 50th anniversary of Vostok 6, the first spaceshot by a woman, Valentina Tereshkova, Karen L. Nyberg was one of two women in space, the other being Wang Yaping aboard Tiangong-1 on the Shenzhou 10 mission.
On 2013 July 16, during EVA-23, Luca Parmitano reported that water was steadily leaking into his helmet. Flight controllers elected to abort the EVA immediately, and Parmitano made his way back to the Quest airlock, followed by Chris Cassidy, with whom he was performing the EVA. The airlock began re-pressurizing after a 1 hour and 32 minute spacewalk, and by this time Parmitano was having difficulty seeing, hearing, and speaking due to the amount of water in his suit. After re-pressurization, commander Pavel Vinogradov and crew member Fyodor Yurchikhin quickly removed Parmitano's helmet and soaked up the water with towels. Despite the incident, Parmitano was reported to be in good spirits and suffered no injury

This patch was produced for Center for operation of space ground-based infrastructure (TsENKI) in Baikonur and are difficult to find.

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ISS Expedition 36 - A-B Emblem - As flown, corrected

Expedition 36 was the 36th long-duration mission to the International Space Station.
On 2013 June 16, the 50th anniversary of Vostok 6, the first spaceshot by a woman, Valentina Tereshkova, Karen L. Nyberg was one of two women in space, the other being Wang Yaping aboard Tiangong-1 on the Shenzhou 10 mission.
On 2013 July 16, during EVA-23, Luca Parmitano reported that water was steadily leaking into his helmet. Flight controllers elected to abort the EVA immediately, and Parmitano made his way back to the Quest airlock, followed by Chris Cassidy, with whom he was performing the EVA. The airlock began re-pressurizing after a 1 hour and 32 minute spacewalk, and by this time Parmitano was having difficulty seeing, hearing, and speaking due to the amount of water in his suit. After re-pressurization, commander Pavel Vinogradov and crew member Fyodor Yurchikhin quickly removed Parmitano's helmet and soaked up the water with towels. Despite the incident, Parmitano was reported to be in good spirits and suffered no injury

This is the version of the A-B Emblem patch that was flown and worn on the Sokol and Kentavr suits. A limited number of this patch was created to correct the invalid "y" in Misurkin and clarify the cyrillic "ad" in Vinogradov. 

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3
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2
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ISS Expedition 36 - A-B Emblem - With names

Expedition 36 was the 36th long-duration mission to the International Space Station.
On 2013 June 16, the 50th anniversary of Vostok 6, the first spaceshot by a woman, Valentina Tereshkova, Karen L. Nyberg was one of two women in space, the other being Wang Yaping aboard Tiangong-1 on the Shenzhou 10 mission.
On 2013 July 16, during EVA-23, Luca Parmitano reported that water was steadily leaking into his helmet. Flight controllers elected to abort the EVA immediately, and Parmitano made his way back to the Quest airlock, followed by Chris Cassidy, with whom he was performing the EVA. The airlock began re-pressurizing after a 1 hour and 32 minute spacewalk, and by this time Parmitano was having difficulty seeing, hearing, and speaking due to the amount of water in his suit. After re-pressurization, commander Pavel Vinogradov and crew member Fyodor Yurchikhin quickly removed Parmitano's helmet and soaked up the water with towels. Despite the incident, Parmitano was reported to be in good spirits and suffered no injury

This is the common A-B Emblem souvenir version with names. 

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ISS Expedition 36 - A-B Emblem - No names

Expedition 36 was the 36th long-duration mission to the International Space Station.
On 2013 June 16, the 50th anniversary of Vostok 6, the first spaceshot by a woman, Valentina Tereshkova, Karen L. Nyberg was one of two women in space, the other being Wang Yaping aboard Tiangong-1 on the Shenzhou 10 mission.
On 2013 July 16, during EVA-23, Luca Parmitano reported that water was steadily leaking into his helmet. Flight controllers elected to abort the EVA immediately, and Parmitano made his way back to the Quest airlock, followed by Chris Cassidy, with whom he was performing the EVA. The airlock began re-pressurizing after a 1 hour and 32 minute spacewalk, and by this time Parmitano was having difficulty seeing, hearing, and speaking due to the amount of water in his suit. After re-pressurization, commander Pavel Vinogradov and crew member Fyodor Yurchikhin quickly removed Parmitano's helmet and soaked up the water with towels. Despite the incident, Parmitano was reported to be in good spirits and suffered no injury

This is the common A-B Emblem souvenir version. 

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Apollo 16 - 5" - Charlie Duke

This edition of the Apollo 16 patch is 5" in diameter and was issued by Charlie Duke. His initials can be seen below the large crater on the right side. 

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Apollo 15 - USS Okinawa - Recovery fleet - Gemsco

This is the original era Apollo 15 recovery patch by Gemsco. Many reproductions exist, but are smaller than this patch. 

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5
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Apollo 16 recovery, USS Ticonderoga - Vintage

USS Ticonderoga/Apollo 16 recovery patch vintage, original era issue. 

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4
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Columbus ISS Module

Columbus is a science laboratory that is part of the International Space Station (ISS) and is the largest single contribution to the ISS made by the European Space Agency (ESA).
Like the Harmony and Tranquility modules, the Columbus laboratory was constructed in Turin, Italy by Rome based Alcatel Alenia Space with respect to structures and thermal control. The functional architecture (including software) of the lab was designed by EADS in Germany where it was also integrated before being flown to the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Florida in an Airbus Beluga. It was launched aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis on February 7, 2008 on flight STS-122. It is designed for ten years of operation. The module is controlled by the Columbus Control Centre, located at the German Space Operations Centre, part of the German Aerospace Center in Oberpfaffenhofen near Munich, Germany.
The European Space Agency has spent €1.4 billion (about US$2 billion) on building Columbus, including the experiments that will fly in it and the ground control infrastructure necessary to operate them.

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STS-135 - 4" - Unknown maker

STS-135 (ISS assembly flight ULF7) was the 135th and final mission of the American Space Shuttle program. It used the orbiter Atlantis and hardware originally processed for the STS-335 contingency mission, which was not flown. STS-135 launched on 8 July 2011, and landed on 21 July 2011, following a one-day mission extension. The four-person crew was the smallest of any shuttle mission since STS-6 in April 1983. The mission's primary cargo was the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) Raffaello and a Lightweight Multi-Purpose Carrier (LMC), which were delivered to the International Space Station (ISS). The flight of Raffaello marked the only time that Atlantis carried an MPLM.

The STS-135 patch represents the space shuttle Atlantis embarking on its mission to resupply the International Space Station. Atlantis is centered over elements of the NASA emblem depicting how the space shuttle has been at the heart of NASA for the last 30 years. It also pays tribute to the entire NASA and contractor team that made possible all the incredible accomplishments of the space shuttle. Omega, the last letter in the Greek alphabet, recognizes this mission as the last flight of the Space Shuttle Program.

This version of the STS-135 patch is nearly identical to the A-B Emblem version but has some subtle differences between the stars and "STS" and "135" sizing.

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STS-135 - 4" - Unknown maker

STS-135 (ISS assembly flight ULF7) was the 135th and final mission of the American Space Shuttle program. It used the orbiter Atlantis and hardware originally processed for the STS-335 contingency mission, which was not flown. STS-135 launched on 8 July 2011, and landed on 21 July 2011, following a one-day mission extension. The four-person crew was the smallest of any shuttle mission since STS-6 in April 1983. The mission's primary cargo was the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) Raffaello and a Lightweight Multi-Purpose Carrier (LMC), which were delivered to the International Space Station (ISS). The flight of Raffaello marked the only time that Atlantis carried an MPLM.

The STS-135 patch represents the space shuttle Atlantis embarking on its mission to resupply the International Space Station. Atlantis is centered over elements of the NASA emblem depicting how the space shuttle has been at the heart of NASA for the last 30 years. It also pays tribute to the entire NASA and contractor team that made possible all the incredible accomplishments of the space shuttle. Omega, the last letter in the Greek alphabet, recognizes this mission as the last flight of the Space Shuttle Program.

This version of the STS-135 patch has a single colored external tank and slightly larger lettering for the crew names. The stars are significantly larger dots.

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5" / 128mm
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STS-135 - 4" - Unknown maker

STS-135 (ISS assembly flight ULF7) was the 135th and final mission of the American Space Shuttle program. It used the orbiter Atlantis and hardware originally processed for the STS-335 contingency mission, which was not flown. STS-135 launched on 8 July 2011, and landed on 21 July 2011, following a one-day mission extension. The four-person crew was the smallest of any shuttle mission since STS-6 in April 1983. The mission's primary cargo was the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) Raffaello and a Lightweight Multi-Purpose Carrier (LMC), which were delivered to the International Space Station (ISS). The flight of Raffaello marked the only time that Atlantis carried an MPLM.

The STS-135 patch represents the space shuttle Atlantis embarking on its mission to resupply the International Space Station. Atlantis is centered over elements of the NASA emblem depicting how the space shuttle has been at the heart of NASA for the last 30 years. It also pays tribute to the entire NASA and contractor team that made possible all the incredible accomplishments of the space shuttle. Omega, the last letter in the Greek alphabet, recognizes this mission as the last flight of the Space Shuttle Program.

This version of the STS-135 patch is nearly identical to the A-B Emblem version however, there is a black stitch between the colors of the external tank. The stars on the blue field are slightly larger dots. 

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5" / 128mm
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STS-135 - 4" - A-B Emblem

STS-135 (ISS assembly flight ULF7) was the 135th and final mission of the American Space Shuttle program. It used the orbiter Atlantis and hardware originally processed for the STS-335 contingency mission, which was not flown. STS-135 launched on 8 July 2011, and landed on 21 July 2011, following a one-day mission extension. The four-person crew was the smallest of any shuttle mission since STS-6 in April 1983. The mission's primary cargo was the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) Raffaello and a Lightweight Multi-Purpose Carrier (LMC), which were delivered to the International Space Station (ISS). The flight of Raffaello marked the only time that Atlantis carried an MPLM.

The STS-135 patch represents the space shuttle Atlantis embarking on its mission to resupply the International Space Station. Atlantis is centered over elements of the NASA emblem depicting how the space shuttle has been at the heart of NASA for the last 30 years. It also pays tribute to the entire NASA and contractor team that made possible all the incredible accomplishments of the space shuttle. Omega, the last letter in the Greek alphabet, recognizes this mission as the last flight of the Space Shuttle Program.

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STS-129 - 4" - Unknown maker

STS-129 (ISS assembly flight ULF3) was a NASA Space Shuttle mission to the International Space Station (ISS). Atlantis was launched on November 16, 2009 at 14:28 EST, and landed at 09:44 EST on November 27, 2009 on runway 33 at the Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility.
STS-129 focused on staging spare components outside the station. The 11-day flight included three spacewalks. The payload bay carried two large ExPRESS Logistics Carriers holding two spare gyroscopes, two nitrogen tank assemblies, two pump modules, an ammonia tank assembly, a spare latching end effector for the station's robotic arm, a spare trailing umbilical system for the Mobile Transporter, and a high-pressure gas tank. STS-129 was the first flight of an ExPRESS Logistics Carrier. The completion of this mission left six space shuttle flights remaining until the end of the Space Shuttle program, after STS-135 was approved in February 2011.

For STS-129 the sun shines brightly on the International Space Station (ISS) above and the United States below representing the bright future of U.S. human spaceflight. The contiguous U.S., Rocky Mountains, and Great Desert Southwest are clearly visible on the earth below encompassing all the NASA centers and the homes of the many dedicated people that work to make our Space Program possible. The integrated shapes of the patch signifying the two Express Logistics Carriers that will be delivered by STS-129 providing valuable equipment ensuring the longevity of the ISS. The Space Shuttle is vividly silhouetted by the sun highlighting how brightly the Orbiters have performed as a workhorse for the U.S. Space Program over the past 3 decades. The Space Shuttle ascends on the Astronaut symbol portrayed by the Red, White and Blue swoosh bounded by the gold halo. This symbol is worn with pride by this U.S. crew representing their country on STS-129. The names of the crew members are denoted on the outer band of the patch. As STS-129 launches, the Space Shuttle is in its twilight years. This fact is juxtaposed by the 13 stars on the patch which are symbolic of our children who are the future. The Moon and Mars feature predominantly to represent just how close humankind is to reaching further exploration of those heavenly bodies and how the current Space Shuttle and ISS missions are laying the essential ground work for those future endeavors.

This version of the STS-129 patch has a merrowed edge, gold solar panels and has more elaborate stars.

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STS-129 - 4" - A-B Emblem

STS-129 (ISS assembly flight ULF3) was a NASA Space Shuttle mission to the International Space Station (ISS). Atlantis was launched on November 16, 2009 at 14:28 EST, and landed at 09:44 EST on November 27, 2009 on runway 33 at the Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility.
STS-129 focused on staging spare components outside the station. The 11-day flight included three spacewalks. The payload bay carried two large ExPRESS Logistics Carriers holding two spare gyroscopes, two nitrogen tank assemblies, two pump modules, an ammonia tank assembly, a spare latching end effector for the station's robotic arm, a spare trailing umbilical system for the Mobile Transporter, and a high-pressure gas tank. STS-129 was the first flight of an ExPRESS Logistics Carrier. The completion of this mission left six space shuttle flights remaining until the end of the Space Shuttle program, after STS-135 was approved in February 2011.

For STS-129 the sun shines brightly on the International Space Station (ISS) above and the United States below representing the bright future of U.S. human spaceflight. The contiguous U.S., Rocky Mountains, and Great Desert Southwest are clearly visible on the earth below encompassing all the NASA centers and the homes of the many dedicated people that work to make our Space Program possible. The integrated shapes of the patch signifying the two Express Logistics Carriers that will be delivered by STS-129 providing valuable equipment ensuring the longevity of the ISS. The Space Shuttle is vividly silhouetted by the sun highlighting how brightly the Orbiters have performed as a workhorse for the U.S. Space Program over the past 3 decades. The Space Shuttle ascends on the Astronaut symbol portrayed by the Red, White and Blue swoosh bounded by the gold halo. This symbol is worn with pride by this U.S. crew representing their country on STS-129. The names of the crew members are denoted on the outer band of the patch. As STS-129 launches, the Space Shuttle is in its twilight years. This fact is juxtaposed by the 13 stars on the patch which are symbolic of our children who are the future. The Moon and Mars feature predominantly to represent just how close humankind is to reaching further exploration of those heavenly bodies and how the current Space Shuttle and ISS missions are laying the essential ground work for those future endeavors.

This patch features a cut edge.

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STS-126 - 4- Unknown maker

STS-126 was a Space Shuttle mission to the International Space Station (ISS) flown by Space Shuttle Endeavour.[3] The purpose of the mission, referred to as ULF2 by the ISS program, was to deliver equipment and supplies to the station, to service the Solar Alpha Rotary Joints (SARJ), and repair the problem in the starboard SARJ that had limited its use since STS-120. STS-126 launched on 14 November 2008 at 19:55:39 pm EST from Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center with no delays or issues.
STS-126 was scheduled to be a sixteen day mission with four spacewalks, largely dedicated to servicing and repair of the Solar Alpha Rotary Joints (SARJ). An additional docked day was added to the flight plan to give the crew more time to complete their tasks.[18] The starboard SARJ had shown anomalous behavior since August 2007, and its use has been minimized pending diagnosis and repair. Both the starboard and port SARJs were serviced. In addition to lubricating both bearings, the remaining 11 trundle bearings in the starboard SARJ were replaced. Trundle bearing assembly five was removed during an Expedition 16 EVA for further examination in December 2007.
STS-126 included the Leonardo Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) on its fifth spaceflight.

The STS-126 patch represents Space Shuttle Endeavour on its mission to help complete the assembly of the International Space Station (ISS). The inner patch outline depicts the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) Leonardo. This reusable logistics module will carry the equipment necessary to sustain a crew of six on board the ISS and will include additional crew quarters, exercise equipment, galley, and life support equipment. In addition, a single expedition crew member will launch on STS-126 to remain on board ISS, replacing an expedition crew member who will return home with the shuttle crew. Near the center of the patch, the constellation Orion reflects the goals of the human spaceflight program, returning us to the Moon and on to Mars, the red planet, which are also shown. At the top of the patch is the gold symbol of the astronaut office. The sunburst, just clearing the horizon of the magnificent Earth, powers all these efforts through the solar arrays of the ISS current configuration orbiting high above.

This version of the STS-126 patch is very similar to the A-B Emblem version however it lacks the red star and has some other subtle differences.

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STS-126 - 4- A-B Emblem

STS-126 was a Space Shuttle mission to the International Space Station (ISS) flown by Space Shuttle Endeavour.[3] The purpose of the mission, referred to as ULF2 by the ISS program, was to deliver equipment and supplies to the station, to service the Solar Alpha Rotary Joints (SARJ), and repair the problem in the starboard SARJ that had limited its use since STS-120. STS-126 launched on 14 November 2008 at 19:55:39 pm EST from Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center with no delays or issues.
STS-126 was scheduled to be a sixteen day mission with four spacewalks, largely dedicated to servicing and repair of the Solar Alpha Rotary Joints (SARJ). An additional docked day was added to the flight plan to give the crew more time to complete their tasks.[18] The starboard SARJ had shown anomalous behavior since August 2007, and its use has been minimized pending diagnosis and repair. Both the starboard and port SARJs were serviced. In addition to lubricating both bearings, the remaining 11 trundle bearings in the starboard SARJ were replaced. Trundle bearing assembly five was removed during an Expedition 16 EVA for further examination in December 2007.
STS-126 included the Leonardo Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) on its fifth spaceflight.

The STS-126 patch represents Space Shuttle Endeavour on its mission to help complete the assembly of the International Space Station (ISS). The inner patch outline depicts the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) Leonardo. This reusable logistics module will carry the equipment necessary to sustain a crew of six on board the ISS and will include additional crew quarters, exercise equipment, galley, and life support equipment. In addition, a single expedition crew member will launch on STS-126 to remain on board ISS, replacing an expedition crew member who will return home with the shuttle crew. Near the center of the patch, the constellation Orion reflects the goals of the human spaceflight program, returning us to the Moon and on to Mars, the red planet, which are also shown. At the top of the patch is the gold symbol of the astronaut office. The sunburst, just clearing the horizon of the magnificent Earth, powers all these efforts through the solar arrays of the ISS current configuration orbiting high above.

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Apollo-Soyuz Test Project - Support crew patch

"Troop" = Richard H. Truly
"Bo Bob" = Karol J. Bobko
"Crip" = Robert L. Crippen

"Johnny" = Dzhanibekov
"Boris" = Andreyev
"Yuri" = Romanenko
"Sasha" = Ivanchenko

Extremely rare.

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USS Wasp Gemini Recovery Ship - Hilborn Hamburger

This is the original period patch commeorating the USS Wasp's role in the Gemini capsule recoveries. 

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