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sts-78

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STS-78 Crew Patch Variations

As a patch collector there's always a modest amount of due diligence involved in both identifying patches and seeing how they fit into the program. Chris Spain has done an amazing job of cataloging crew patches up through the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project on his Crew Patches web site. It's an invaluable resource when trying to identify vintage patches. There aren't such cut and dried resources for STS and later patches, though www.spacepatches.nl does a great job of this as well. 

STS-78 - 4" - A-B Emblem

Launch June 20, 1996, landed July 7, 1996 The scheduled 15 day, 21 hour STS-78 Life and Microgravity Spacelab (LMS) mission will help set the stage for the International Space Station by studying the effects of long-duration space flight on human physiology and conducting the type of experiments that would fly on the orbital platform.
The STS-78 patch links past with present to tell the story of its mission and science through a design imbued with the strength and vitality of the 2-dimensional art of North America's northwest coast Indians. Central to the design is the space Shuttle whose bold lines and curves evoke the Indian image for the eagle, a native American symbol of power and prestige as well as the national symbol of the United States. The wings of the Shuttle suggest the wings of the eagle whose feathers, indicative of peace and friendship in Indian tradition, are captured by the U forms, a characteristic feature of Northwest coast Indian art. The nose of the Shuttle is the strong downward curve of the eagle's beak, and the Shuttle's forward windows, the eagle's eyes, represented through the tapered S forms again typical of this Indian art form. The basic black and red atoms orbiting the mission number recall the original NASA emblem while beneath, utilizing Indian ovoid forms, the major mission scientific experiment package LMS (Life and Materials Sciences) housed in the Shuttle's cargo bay is depicted in a manner reminiscent of totem-pole art. 
This version of the STS-78 patch has black circles on the outer arm of the stylized sun.

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4" / 100mm
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Norm Thirsk - Personal Patch (reproduction)

This patch's colors vary slightly from the common patch.

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Robert Thirsk - Personal Patch

Canadian astronaut Robert Thirsk on STS-78

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Life and Microgravity Spacelab (LMS)

LMS was a shuttle mission using the spacelab module to conduct life and microgravity experiments in a weightless environment. Experimenters from all over the world used the spacelab module facilities to conduct a wide variety of experiments from microgravity bubble behavior to protein chrystallization. Experiments also focused on the effects of weightlessness on human physiology and function. Flown on board STS-78

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STS-78 - 4" - Eagle Crest Emblem

Launch June 20, 1996, landed July 7, 1996 The scheduled 15 day, 21 hour STS-78 Life and Microgravity Spacelab (LMS) mission will help set the stage for the International Space Station by studying the effects of long-duration space flight on human physiology and conducting the type of experiments that would fly on the orbital platform.
The STS-78 patch links past with present to tell the story of its mission and science through a design imbued with the strength and vitality of the 2-dimensional art of North America's northwest coast Indians. Central to the design is the space Shuttle whose bold lines and curves evoke the Indian image for the eagle, a native American symbol of power and prestige as well as the national symbol of the United States. The wings of the Shuttle suggest the wings of the eagle whose feathers, indicative of peace and friendship in Indian tradition, are captured by the U forms, a characteristic feature of Northwest coast Indian art. The nose of the Shuttle is the strong downward curve of the eagle's beak, and the Shuttle's forward windows, the eagle's eyes, represented through the tapered S forms again typical of this Indian art form. The basic black and red atoms orbiting the mission number recall the original NASA emblem while beneath, utilizing Indian ovoid forms, the major mission scientific experiment package LMS (Life and Materials Sciences) housed in the Shuttle's cargo bay is depicted in a manner reminiscent of totem-pole art. 
This version of the STS-78 patch has black circles on the outer arm of the stylized sun.

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Bubble, Drop and Particle Unit (BDPU)

Since its first flight on the Second International Microgravity Laboratory (IML-2) mission in July of 1994, the BDPU has been
upgraded to accommodate a high-voltage power supply so that experiments on electrohydrodynamic processes can be performed.

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